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  • Corporate Finance and Governance: Government Policy and Regulation x
  • Switzerland x
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Ljubica Dordevic, Caio Ferreira, Moses Kitonga, and Katharine Seal
The paper employs two complementary strategies. First, it is pursues textual analysis (text mining) of the assessment reports to identify successes and challenges the authorities are facing. Second, it analyzes the grades in the Basel Core Principles assessments, including their evolution and association with bank fragility.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper discusses the findings of Detailed Assessment of International Association of Insurance Supervisors (IAIS) insurance core principles on Italy. Regulation and supervision of the insurance industry in Italy is the responsibility of the newly established Institution for the Supervision of Insurance (IVASS). IVASS has reached international best practice in several areas of supervision. IVASS actively exercises group supervision and by 2000, IVASS established the first college of supervisors. Intragroup transactions and related party participations limits are strictly monitored and enforced. IVASS handling of the licensing of undertakings is complete and comprehensive and ensures appropriate considerations pursuant to regulations. Enhanced supervision in some areas is required.
International Monetary Fund
This technical note discusses key findings of the assessment of Insurance Core Principles (ICP) for the reinsurance industry for Switzerland. It reveals that the Swiss reinsurance market is dominated by three large players with a strong international presence. The reinsurance industry comprises 20 professional reinsurers and 50 reinsurance captives with gross premiums written totaling SwF 37.4 billion for 2005. Swiss Re, European Re, and Converium have consistently maintained more than 75 percent market share. More than 95 percent of reinsurance premiums came from foreign business.
Mariusz Jarmuzek and Mr. Tonny Lybek
This paper argues that better governance practices can reduce the costs, risks and uncertainty of financial intermediation. Our sample covers high-, middle- and low-income countries before and after the global financial crisis (GFC). We find that net interest margins of banks are lower if various governance indicators are better. More cross-border lending also appears conducive to lower intermediation costs, while the level of capital market development is not significant. The GFC seems not to have had a strong impact except via credit risk. Finally, we estimate the size of potential gains from improved governance.
Mr. Luc Laeven and Mr. Ross Levine
The bulk of corporate governance theory examines the agency problems that arise from two extreme ownership structures: 100 percent small shareholders or one large, controlling owner combined with small shareholders. In this paper, we question the empirical validity of this dichotomy. In fact, one-third of publicly listed firms in Europe have multiple large owners, and the market value of firms with multiple blockholders differs from firms with a single large owner and from widely-held firms. Moreover, the relationship between corporate valuations and the distribution of cash-flow rights across multiple large owners is consistent with the predictions of recent theoretical models.