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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) approach has been broadly accepted as the operational framework for bringing together national policies and development assistance in support of low-income countries’ efforts to meet the Millennium Development Goals. The IMF, the World Bank, and other multilateral and bilateral development agencies are now committed to using the PRSP operational framework to support low-income countries; and the IMF is aligning the content and process of its operations to reflect this commitment.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The IMF is carrying out an extensive research program to examine key macroeconomic issues that confront low-income countries in the design and implementation of their national poverty reduction strategies. Drawing on findings from the 2002 joint World Bank-IMF review of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper approach and the IMF review of the Poverty Reduction Growth Facility, research projects are planned and under way in five priority areas:

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

IMF studies on the determinants of growth and poverty in low-income countries cover a broad range of themes, though almost all share an empirical approach to research. These studies broadly explore issues of income distribution, social safety nets, and productivity. Several papers have focused more narrowly on growth in sub-Saharan Africa—in particular, the relationship between HIV/AIDS and economic growth. Relatively fewer have dealt with the subject of savings and investment.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Summarizes the for ward-looking analytical work program on macroeconomic issues related to the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper approach. The program is evolving through a process that began with a technical workshop; participants from low-income countries, donors, academia, and civil society drafted guidance on selected issues and identified priority research topics. Partners, policymakers, and economic scholars are encouraged to share their perspectives and findings through respective team leaders, whose e-mail addresses are provided. The publication also summarizes IMF analytical work, and contains a bibliography of nearly 1,000 papers.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Member country use of IMF resources decreased in 1999, to SDR 10.8 billion (about $14.7 billion) from SDR 21.5 billion ($29.3 billion) in 1998, as member country economies recovered from the severe crises that had affected many regions in 1998. While lending under all facilities decreased in 1999, several member countries received large disbursements during the year. Brazil received the largest disbursement of any member, under the Supplemental Reserve Facility, for SDR 3.6 billion ($4.9 billion) and also SDR 814.1 million ($1.1 billion) under a Stand-By Arrangement. Mexico received the largest disbursement under a Stand-By Arrangement, SDR 1.04 billion ($1.4 billion). Disbursements under the Extended Fund Facility (EFF) were dominated by drawings totaling SDR 1.0 billion ($1.4 billion) by Indonesia. Nicaragua received the largest disbursement under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF), for SDR 78.3 million ($106.7 million).

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Summarizes the for ward-looking analytical work program on macroeconomic issues related to the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper approach. The program is evolving through a process that began with a technical workshop; participants from low-income countries, donors, academia, and civil society drafted guidance on selected issues and identified priority research topics. Partners, policymakers, and economic scholars are encouraged to share their perspectives and findings through respective team leaders, whose e-mail addresses are provided. The publication also summarizes IMF analytical work, and contains a bibliography of nearly 1,000 papers.

International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund
This 2003 Article IV Consultation for Hungary highlights that developments in growth and inflation were broadly positive in 2002. Buoyed by domestic demand, real GDP growth increased to 3.5 percent (year-over-year) in the second half of 2002 from 3.0 percent in the first half. Headline inflation declined from its recent peak of 10.8 percent in May of 2001 to 4.8 percent at end-2002. The external current account deficit widened in 2002, although foreign direct investment fell off sharply.
International Monetary Fund
This paper provides the details of the IMF's projections and estimates on Nicaragua's gross domestic product by expenditure; value added in agriculture and manufacturing; central government operations; operations of the rest of the general government and public utility enterprises; summary balance of payments; trade account indicators; public sector external debt and debt service; summary accounts of the central bank and the financial system; consumer price index; resource balance and financing of investment, and so on. It also provides the statistical appendix report on real, fiscal, monetary, and external sectors.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews economic developments in Nicaragua during 1990–96. During 1990–95, Nicaragua made substantial progress in policy implementation to reduce macroeconomic imbalances and to transform itself to a market-based economy. Fiscal and monetary policies were strengthened; most price controls were eliminated; and the foreign exchange and trade systems were liberalized. A program of public asset divestment was implemented and public employment and military outlays were cut substantially. An extensive reform of the banking system was initiated by allowing private sector participation in financial intermediation; interest rates were liberalized; and banking supervision was established.