Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 58 items for :

Clear All
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

After slowing in 2012, global growth is projected to pick up during 2013–14, supported by policy actions in advanced economies that have helped mitigate downside risks. The global economy is expanding at three different speeds, with the emerging economies growing rapidly, activity in the United States gaining momentum, and Europe continuing to lag as it struggles with balance sheet repair. In this context, external financing conditions are expected to remain easy and commodity prices near their current high levels in the coming years. However, these conditions could reverse over the medium term, including if advanced economies do not decisively deal with unsustainable debt dynamics or if growth falters in key emerging economies.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

Output growth in Latin America firmed up toward the end of 2012, after moderating earlier in the year, particularly in some of the region’s largest economies. In most economies, domestic demand remained robust and external current account deficits widened further. Growth is set to pick up further in 2013, supported by stronger external demand. In the context of closed output gaps and relatively easy financing conditions, key policy priorities are strengthening public finances and protecting financial sector stability. In the Caribbean, growth continues to be held back by high debt levels and weak competitiveness.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

Latin America has enjoyed strong growth momentum during the last decade. While factor accumulation remains the main driver of GDP growth, the recent acceleration is mainly explained by higher total factor productivity (TFP). However, moving forward, this growth momentum might not be sustainable given some natural constraints on labor, despite recent capital and TFP trends.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

Highly favorable terms of trade and external financing conditions have helped Latin America strengthen its fiscal and external fundamentals markedly over the last decade. But, how dependent are these gains on a continuation of such conditions? This chapter assesses debt sustainability under less favorable external scenarios. It finds that, while some countries are well placed to withstand sizeable shocks, many would benefit from a stronger fiscal position to be able to deploy countercyclical policies, especially under tail events. External sustainability, in turn, does not appear to be a source of concern for most countries yet.

Luis A.V. Catão

'Global Governance: Who's in Charge?' examines the challenges—financial, health, environmental, and trade—facing the international community in the 21st century and asks whether today';s system of global governance is equipped to cope with them. The lead article asserts that the system that served as a model for much of the 20th century is out of date, and it explores what needs to be done to strengthen it. Other articles on this theme look at the recent U.S. subprime market crisis, the differences between financial crises of the 19th and 20th centuries and what future crises will look like, the need for a stronger system of multilateral trade, and how global health threats can be handled. 'People in Economics' profiles Michael Kremer; 'Picture This' describes the changing aid landscape; 'Country Focus' spotlights the United Arab Emirates; and 'Straight Talk' examines the impact of high food prices. Also in this issue, articles examine development in Africa, and 'backcasting' data in Latin America.

International Monetary Fund

This paper analyzes Bolivia’s growth performance with a focus on the regional and sectoral patterns of growth, and examines the sources of growth. It discusses the evolution of the hydrocarbon sector, its importance in the economy, and reforms. It also analyzes the intergovernmental fiscal relations system and changes to the revenue sharing arrangements, and suggests possible areas for reform. It assesses measures of reserve adequacy in Bolivia and also provides a look at the external debt after the applications of the main debt relief plans in the past 10 years.