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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
This Selected Issues paper discusses various aspects of goods and service tax (GST) on India’s tax policy. Dual rate structure with a low standard rate and an additional higher rate on select items can be progressive and preserve revenue neutrality, while streamlining exemptions would further contribute to progressivity and reduce compliance and administrative costs. Simplifying the GST is possible without imposing a significantly higher burden on the poor. There are likely significant benefits from lower costs of compliance and administration. The literature on value added tax (VAT) compliance costs shows that there is broad variation across countries; however, there is a consensus that compliance costs are regressive and administrative costs increase with complexity. While evidence on India is nascent and remains to be assessed as experience with the GST is gained, anecdotal evidence from large firms indicates sizable increases in costs, which may be even more burdensome for smaller firms. Streamlined rates would also weaken incentives to lobby for lower rates.
International Monetary Fund
Gabon continues to enjoy record high oil prices, buoying both exports and government revenues. The critical medium-term challenge facing Gabon is managing the transition from an economy highly dependent on oil to a diversified economy that harnesses private sector initiative, and makes decisive progress in poverty reduction. The fiscal policy stance requires significant tightening. Raising economic growth and reducing poverty necessitate the acceleration of the structural reform agenda. Fostering transparency is a key ingredient to strengthening governance and accountability in Gabon.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund
This paper describes economic developments in Guinea–Bissau during the 1990s. Following mixed economic performance in 1991–92, a period of financial stabilization in 1993–94 led to an economic program that was supported by a three-year annual arrangement under the Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility approved in January 1995. After some difficulties in early 1995, the program objectives for budgetary revenue, the external account, and real growth rate were surpassed. Economic developments were generally favorable in 1996 and 1997 although inflation continued to be a source of concern until mid-1997.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund
This paper provides on analysis of the IMF's projections and estimates for Mauritania on gross domestic product by sector of origin at constant 1985 prices; growth of output by sector; gross domestic product and expenditures and savings at current prices; public utility rates; net production of electricity and water; civil service size and recruitment; consolidated government revenue, expenditures, and financial operations; treasury expenditure; monetary survey; balance of payments; services; assets and liabilities of the central bank and commercial banks; public investment program and its financing during 1995–99; summary of the tax systems, 2000, and so on.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews economic developments in Guinea during 1990–98. Economic developments were dominated by the coming on stream of important oil fields in 1992 and 1996, and the subsequent breakdown in fiscal discipline and transparency. In response to the January 1994 devaluation of the CFA franc, there was also an upturn in the non-oil sector, led by intensification in logging activity that resulted in an unsustainable level of timber output in 1997. Real GDP growth averaged 8.5 percent a year in 1992–95, and rose to 29 percent in 1996.
International Monetary Fund
The report provides the details of the projections and estimates of Mauritania's gross domestic product by activity at current prices, 1992–2005 and at 1998 prices, 1993–2005; iron ore production, exports and stocks, consolidated government operations and revenue, 1994–2005; consumption of petroleum products, 1995–2005; monetary survey, foreign assets and liabilities of the banking system, assets and liabilities of the central bank and commercial banks, exports and imports, external publicly guaranteed debt outstanding and debt services, income and transfers, foreign trade indices, SNIM operating accounts and balance sheet, supply of cereals, etc.