Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

Clear All
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
The economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is unprecedented. Israel’s economic activity recorded a historic contraction, and the outlook remains challenging, with possible long-term scarring. Uncertainty is high, mainly driven by the evolution of the pandemic, the prospects for widespread vaccine distribution, and political uncertainty.
International Monetary Fund
Israel was mildly affected by the global recession: following a slowdown in 2009, output is projected to grow by some 4 percent in 2010, led by consumption and exports. Robust fundamentals—including sustained pre-crisis fiscal consolidation—and a swift monetary and fiscal policy response to the external downturn allowed Israel to pass through the global recession relatively unscathed. The resilience of the economy has been strengthened by the adoption of new fiscal rules capping spending and deficits.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This 2013 Article IV consultation highlights the moderate growth of the economy of Israel. Abstracting from the impact of new large-scale natural gas production, GDP growth is estimated to have moderated to about 2.5 percent in 2013, owing in large part to weak investment and exports. Some pickup is expected in 2014, but the underlying momentum is weaker than before. Despite notable progress, Israel’s public debt remains high, while continued housing price increases pose risks of a boom-bust cycle in the housing market. The key policy challenge is to maintain near-term growth at potential, while preventing the buildup of imbalances, strengthening resilience to shocks, and ensuring long-term sustainability.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
Israel’s economy is growing well with inflation remaining low and the housing market cooling. Growth of about 3½ percent in 2017 helped bring unemployment below four percent in early 2018, supporting robust wage rises averaging 3¼ percent. Yet, partly owing to the appreciation of the shekel, inflation remained below the 1–3 percent target range. House price increases slowed to below two percent as proposed tax measures deterred investor interest. Prospects for the next few years are for growth to remain around 3½ percent with inflation rising gradually.
International Monetary Fund

This Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes—Data Module provides an assessment of Israel’s macroeconomic statistics against the Special Data Dissemination Standard complemented by an assessment of data quality based on the IMF’s Data Quality Assessment Framework, July 2003. The assessment reveals that Israel’s macroeconomic statistics are of generally high quality and are broadly adequate to conduct effective surveillance. However, some shortcomings may impede the accurate and timely analysis of economic and financial developments and the formulation of appropriate policy.

International Monetary Fund

This Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes—Data Module provides an assessment of Israel’s macroeconomic statistics against the Special Data Dissemination Standard complemented by an assessment of data quality based on the IMF’s Data Quality Assessment Framework, July 2003. The assessment reveals that Israel’s macroeconomic statistics are of generally high quality and are broadly adequate to conduct effective surveillance. However, some shortcomings may impede the accurate and timely analysis of economic and financial developments and the formulation of appropriate policy.

International Monetary Fund

This Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes—Data Module provides an assessment of Israel’s macroeconomic statistics against the Special Data Dissemination Standard complemented by an assessment of data quality based on the IMF’s Data Quality Assessment Framework, July 2003. The assessment reveals that Israel’s macroeconomic statistics are of generally high quality and are broadly adequate to conduct effective surveillance. However, some shortcomings may impede the accurate and timely analysis of economic and financial developments and the formulation of appropriate policy.

International Monetary Fund

This Selected Issues paper analyzes the empirical relationship between corporate leverage—and other indicators of financial health—and investment in Israel, using dynamic panel data techniques. The results suggest that weak balance sheets may well have contributed to the investment decline of recent years. The impact of financial variables on investment is more pronounced for firms under financial pressure. However, there is little evidence that weak balance sheets’ impact on corporate investment increases during real downturns or following an equity market bust.

International Monetary Fund

This staff report discusses Israel’s 2009 Article IV Consultation on economic developments and policies. The economy has been shielded from the global downturn by the absence of prior housing or bank credit booms, high household savings rates, and the fact that investment goods and consumer durables are mostly imported from abroad. Safe-haven factors that have put upward pressure on the currency appear to have eased along with the global financial sector stabilization, and concerns about the excessive strength of the shekel have not entirely been put to rest.

International Monetary Fund

Israel was mildly affected by the global recession: following a slowdown in 2009, output is projected to grow by some 4 percent in 2010, led by consumption and exports. Robust fundamentals—including sustained pre-crisis fiscal consolidation—and a swift monetary and fiscal policy response to the external downturn allowed Israel to pass through the global recession relatively unscathed. The resilience of the economy has been strengthened by the adoption of new fiscal rules capping spending and deficits.