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Mr. Charles Frederick Kramer

Asia Rising -- explores Asia's role in the world economy, the challenges faced from globalization, the quest for greater regional financial integration, the problem of lagging investment, and why East Asia performed so much better than Latin America. It also looks at the recovery of Japan and the rise of India and China. The economies of the ASEAN-4 come under the microscope in Country Focus. Other articles examine financial sector reform in Africa and the remaining hurdles to financial integration in the European Union. People in Economics profiles Paul Krugman, Back to Basics focuses on hedge funds, and the Straight Talk column looks at the problem of underdevelopment.

International Monetary Fund

This Selected Issues paper on Bangladesh underlies the export performance of readymade garment industry and inflation dynamics. Bangladesh has demonstrated that it is highly competitive in the world’s major garment markets. Inflation inertia, monetary factors, and exchange rate fluctuations are the main determinants of inflation in Bangladesh. Despite adoption of numerous tax policy measures during the past few years, policies implemented by the Bangladesh authorities have not been fully successful in lifting the revenue ratio to a level warranted by developmental objectives.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper examines the expanded role for the International Finance Corporation (IFC) with a major capital increase. The paper highlights that for the first time in its history, the IFC is undertaking a major increase of its share capital. In a decision made by its Board of Governors in November 1977, the IFC’s authorized capital stock has been increased by US$540 million, from US$110 million to US$650 million. Of the increase, US$480 million has been allocated for subscription by current member countries. More than US$165 million has already been subscribed and US$33 million paid.

International Monetary Fund

Burundi is in great need of investment in infrastructure, but fiscal constraints leave little room for additional public spending. Despite this initial recovery, Burundi has yet to rebuild its pre-civil war level of public capital stock. Improving the business climate is one of the keys to attracting higher private investment. Since the Arusha agreement, some progress in the business climate has been made. Burundi is quickly moving away from the unsustainable debt situation and unstable exchange rate of the 1990s.