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International Monetary Fund

This paper describes economic developments in the Azerbaijan Republic during the 1990s. Real GDP declined by more than 70 percent from 1992 to 1995, by which time high inflation had eroded real incomes, the exchange rate had weakened, and international reserves were nearly depleted. In early 1995, the authorities started a comprehensive stabilization program supported by the IMF’s Structural Transformation Facility. Fiscal and credit policies were tightened, while a number of structural reforms were introduced, mainly in the areas of exchange and trade liberalization.

International Monetary Fund

Contents include: Real sector developments: output trends; sectoral developments; and income, wages, and prices. Public finances; fiscal balance; revenue developments; expenditure developments; social safety net. Financial sector developments; monetary and exchange rate developments; the use of monetary instruments; and commercial banking sector developments and bank supervision. External sector developments; current accounts: capital account and external debt; and trade payments, and exchange system. Structural issues: privatization; price liberalization; structure of government; and other structural issues. Statistical tables.

International Monetary Fund

This Selected Issues reviews economic development in Azerbaijan during 1995–99. The Azerbaijan authorities began to implement a far-reaching economic reform program in 1995. As a result, the serious macroeconomic imbalances, which plagued the economy in the early years of the transition, were largely eliminated. Both 1997 and 1998 were characterized by financial stability and strong real growth: average consumer price inflation over this period was close to zero and real GDP growth averaged 8 percent a year.

International Monetary Fund

From the discussions, the paper reveals the vulnerability of the Azerbaijan banking system to conventional risk factors. Despite a stable macroeconomic environment and high margins of intermediation, the profitability of the banking system is on the decline. There has been an increase in the unemployment rate, maternal mortality rates, drop-out rates, and widespread use of unofficial user charges. The role of fiscal and monetary policies in response to an oil boom should be to facilitate a smooth transfer of resources from the non-oil traded sector.

International Monetary Fund

This paper reviews economic developments in Azerbaijan during the 1990s. In 1992, approximately 70–80 percent of producer and consumer prices were liberalized, and enterprises were allowed greater latitude in their price and wage setting. However, price controls were applied on energy and bread prices, price markups remained controlled, and the price liberalization process was constrained by state procurement of major production items. Although the coverage of the state order system was gradually reduced, it still accounted for most of the production of “strategic goods” at end-1994.

International Monetary Fund

This Data Module of the Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) provides an assessment of Azerbaijan’s macroeconomic statistics against the Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS) complemented by an assessment of data quality based on the IMF’s Data Quality Assessment Framework (DQAF), July 2003. The assessment reveals that Azerbaijan’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) meets Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS) specifications for coverage, periodicity, and timeliness. The CPI has good data sources for both weights and prices, based on well-designed household and retail establishment surveys.

International Monetary Fund

This Data Module of the Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) provides an assessment of Azerbaijan’s macroeconomic statistics against the Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS) complemented by an assessment of data quality based on the IMF’s Data Quality Assessment Framework (DQAF), July 2003. The assessment reveals that Azerbaijan’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) meets Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS) specifications for coverage, periodicity, and timeliness. The CPI has good data sources for both weights and prices, based on well-designed household and retail establishment surveys.

International Monetary Fund

This paper presents the Joint Staff Assessment on Azerbaijan Republic’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. The incidence of poverty remains slightly higher among urban than rural households, and is associated with falling employment opportunities and earnings in the formal economy. Although Baku has the largest absolute number of urban poor, poverty incidence is highest in provincial towns. Setting up a system to monitor living standards has been a major achievement, but the monitoring of those standards for refugees and internally displaced persons has serious shortcomings.