Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 38 items for :

  • Fiscal policy x
  • Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty: General x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Following are edited excerpts from a press conference given on April 20 by a group of African finance ministers and central bank governors. The IMF’s External Relations Department has been organizing press conferences with African ministers of finance over the past four years during its spring and Annual Meetings to give African member countries’ representatives the opportunity to express their views on issues of interest to their countries. The ministers also met with the heads of the IMF and the World Bank. Participating in the press briefing were Daudi Ballali, Governor of the Central Bank of Tanzania; Paul Bouabre, Minister of Finance for Côte d’lvoire; Emmanuel Kasonde, Minister of Finance for Zambia; Yaw Osafo-Maafo, Minister of Finance and Economy for Ghana; and Jean-Claude Masangu Mulongo, Governor of the Central Bank of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper highlights that the fight against worldwide inflation was the main theme of the Finance Ministers and central bank Governors from 138 member countries that participated in the 1979 Annual Meeting of the IMF’s Board of Governors in Belgrade in October 1979. Unlike the agenda for the 1978 Meeting, which contained a number of single issues, such as quota increases and special drawing rights allocations, requiring specific decisions and action, the 1979 Meeting was devoted principally to a wide-ranging discussion of the world’s economic problems.

Mr. Mark Allen, Mr. Tony Killick, Yegor Gaidar, Karl Otto Pöhl, Adrian Wood, Nora Lustig, Ricardo López Murphy, and Dennis T. Yasutomo

For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Following its worst economic crisis in 30 years, Colombia has successfully turned the economy around through a combination of fiscal reform and consolidation that has trimmed public debt, policies that substantially reduced inflation, and actions to strengthen the financial system (see box). The policies that have been adopted since 1999, supported by three successive IMF arrangements, have sought to place the country on a path of sustainable growth and reduce inflation while substantially reducing poverty and unemployment. Since 2002, Colombia’s economy has also benefited from a marked improvement in the security situation, although it remains a source of concern. After seven years of IMF economic programs, Colombia exited formal IMF support in November 2006.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

IMF work program; de Rato in Australia, New Zealand; Improving the IEO; Swaziland, Philippines briefs; Inequality in Panama; Namibia: poverty and inequality; Gabon: post-oil era; Growth in Indian states; HIV/AIDS effect; China and India: emerging giants.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

Since the mid-1990s, Tanzania has made major strides in restoring macroeconomic stability and creating an environment conducive to private sector-led growth. These efforts, aided by two successive financing arrangements with the IMF, have positioned the country to make more ambitious structural reforms. On July 28, the IMF approved a new three-year financing arrangement under its Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF). Volker Treichel, Senior Economist in the IMF’s African Department, describes Tanzania’s considerable progress to date and outlines the steps the country is now embarking on to ensure that higher growth also translates into greater employment opportunities and reduced poverty.

BENEDICT CLEMENTS

For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper describes why the international community needs to act now to stand a chance of meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The paper gives example of Ethiopia, one of the poorest countries in the world, with an estimated per capita income of about US$100. According to the World Bank, recent national household surveys find 44 percent of the people in Ethiopia cannot meet basic needs. The paper discusses that Ethiopia in many ways epitomizes why the MDGs are important and why more money is needed to achieve them.