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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper discusses the employment of women in developing countries in the light of recent changes in emphasis on the strategy and objectives of economic development. The paper highlights that in the vast majority of countries—both developed and developing—the role of women is still limited and their responsibilities restricted. This paper examines automated manufacturing techniques in developing economies. The operations and transactions of the special drawing account are discussed. The paper also analyzes Latin America’s prospects for overcoming historical attitudes and other constraints to achieve wider economic integration.

International Monetary Fund
This paper provides a summary of the IMF and the World Bank work programs on anti-money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism following the Fund and Bank Boards' decisions in March 2004 to endorse the revised FATF standard (2003 version) and methodology for the purposes of preparing ROSCs and to expand the areas of Bank/Fund responsibility to cover the revised FATF standard comprehensively. It draws lessons on what has worked well and the challenges and discusses the work program going forward.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper discusses origins of recent estimates of capital requirements for development and highlights some of the issues involved. The paper highlights that there are two possible approaches to making estimates of capital requirements for development. Both approaches are based on the idea that increased income and wealth depend fundamentally upon the application of more capital, either to increase output directly when used in combination with local resources, or indirectly when the use of such capital will lead to a more effective use of other resources.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper explains how the World Bank carries out its most characteristic activity: the identification, preparation, appraisal, and supervision of projects for economic development. The paper highlights that project lending is intended to ensure that the World Bank funds are invested in sound, productive projects with the purpose of contributing both to the borrowing country’s capacity to repay and to the development of its economy. It is in the coincidence of these two purposes that the Bank’s functions as an international financial institution merge with those that it has increasingly assumed as a development institution.