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International Monetary Fund

This 1999 Article IV Consultation highlights that real GDP growth for The Bahamas accelerated from less than 1 percent a year in 1994–95 to 4 percent in 1996, but slowed somewhat in 1997–98 as construction work on a second phase of tourism projects led to a decline in the number of available hotel rooms and in tourist arrivals. Following the completion of the expansion projects in November–December 1998, tourist arrivals rose sharply in the first quarter of 1999.

Nigel Bradshaw

The Caribbean Regional Technical Assistance Centre (CARTAC), located in Barbados, is celebrating its first anniversary, and its ambitious work program suggests it got off to a flying start.

International Monetary Fund

This paper assesses the evolution of Eastern Caribbean Currency Union (ECCU) real exchange rates over time, and examines whether the region has lost competitiveness. The main finding is that there is little evidence of overvaluation of the Eastern Caribbean (EC) dollar. The relationship summarized above permits the calculation of equilibrium current account balances or norms. The financing of ECCU current account imbalances appears stable. This paper also provides evidence on the distinctive impact that tourism plays in the determination of the real exchange rate in tourism-driven economies.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

IMF economists work closely with member countries on a variety of issues. Their unique perspective on country experiences and best practices on global macroeconomic issues are often shared in the form of books on diverse topics such as cross-country comparisons, capacity building, macroeconomic policy, financial integration, and globalization.

International Monetary Fund

The Bahamas’s 2005 Article IV Consultation reports that the economic slowdown has contributed to deterioration in the fiscal accounts. The Bahamas is a small, open, and relatively wealthy economy, which is highly dependent on tourism from the United States and offshore financial activities. Offshore financial activities have developed rapidly since the early 1990s and account for roughly 15 percent of GDP. This has reduced the economy’s dependence on the tourism sector, which is focused on the higher end of the U.S. market but still accounts for one-fourth of GDP.

International Monetary Fund

The staff report for The Bahamas’s 2009 Article IV Consultation examines economic developments and policies. The financial sector, including the offshore sector, accounts for about 20 percent of economic activity. Exchange controls are maintained on capital transactions, narrowing the field of investment opportunities for local wealth, largely to real estate and government debt. Macroeconomic policy has historically been geared to maintaining fiscal sustainability, attracting investment, and supporting the exchange rate peg.

International Monetary Fund
The staff report for The Bahamas’s 2009 Article IV Consultation examines economic developments and policies. The financial sector, including the offshore sector, accounts for about 20 percent of economic activity. Exchange controls are maintained on capital transactions, narrowing the field of investment opportunities for local wealth, largely to real estate and government debt. Macroeconomic policy has historically been geared to maintaining fiscal sustainability, attracting investment, and supporting the exchange rate peg.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper and Statistical Appendix summarizes the evolution of monetary institutions in The Bahamas. It discusses the framework in which monetary policy is conducted in the country. Following a brief description of the evolution of institutions, the paper summarizes the monetary policy objectives and constraints of the central bank, and assesses the instruments to achieve these objectives. The paper concludes that the central bank has been able to use interest rate changes, selective credit controls, and moral suasion to achieve its monetary objectives.