Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 127 items for :

  • World Economic Outlook x
  • Fiscal policy x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Since the initiation of economic reforms in the late 1970s. China has achieved impressive economic growth coupled with significant structural transformation (Figure 32). During 1978–96, real GDP grew on average by over 9 percent a year, contributing to a near quadrupling of per capita income and the lifting of millions out of poverty. Over the same period, many of the distortions and rigidities of the former central planning system were eliminated and market forces came to play an increasingly important role in economic decision making. Concomitantly, the state’s role in the economy was gradually reduced and a dynamic non-state sector emerged that now accounts for almost two-thirds of GDP.1 In addition, as part of the normal process of economic development, employment in agriculture has declined substantially while a thriving manufacturing sector has emerged.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

This annex builds on the discussion in Chapter III and further explores the implications for Europe and the rest of the world of alternative assumptions about labor market reform, fiscal adjustment, and product market liberalization under EMU. While necessarily speculative in nature, the resulting scenarios are meant to illustrate the profound impact that EMU can have on macroeconomic performance depending on progress in these three policy areas.1

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

The following remarks were made by the Acting Chair at the conclusion of the Executive Board’s discussion of the World Economic Outlook, Global Financial Stability Report, and Fiscal Monitor on September 14, 2012.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

The global economy has deteriorated further since the release of the July 2012 WEO Update, and growth projections have been marked down (Table 1.1). Downside risks are now judged to be more elevated than in the April 2012 and September 2011 World Economic Outlook (WEO) reports. A key issue is whether the global economy is just hitting another bout of turbulence in what was always expected to be a slow and bumpy recovery or whether the current slowdown has a more lasting component. The answer depends on whether European and U.S. policymakers deal proactively with their major short-term economic challenges. The WEO forecast assumes that they do, and thus global activity is projected to reaccelerate in the course of 2012; if they do not, the forecast will likely be disappointed once again. For the medium term, important questions remain about how the global economy will operate in a world of high government debt and whether emerging market economies can maintain their strong expansion while shifting further from external to domestic sources of growth. The problem of high public debt existed before the Great Recession, because of population aging and growth in entitlement spending, but the crisis brought the need to address it forward from the long to the medium term.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

Thus far, economic recovery is proceeding broadly as expected, although downside risks remain elevated. Most advanced and a few emerging economies still face major adjustments, including the need to strengthen household balance sheets, stabilize and subsequently reduce high public debt, and repair and reform their financial sectors. In many of these economies, the financial sector is still vulnerable to shocks, and growth appears to be slowing as policy stimulus wanes. By contrast, in emerging and developing economies prudent policies, implemented partly in response to earlier crises, have contributed to a significantly improved medium-term growth outlook relative to the aftermath of previous global recessions. However, activity in these economies, particularly those in emerging Asia, remains dependent on demand in advanced economies. In this setting, global activity is forecast to expand by 4.8 percent in 2010 and 4.2 percent in 2011, with a temporary slowdown during the second half of 2010 and the first half of 2011. Output of emerging and developing economies is projected to expand at rates of 7.1 percent and 6.4 percent in 2010 and 2011, respectively. In advanced economies, however, growth is projected to be only 2.7 percent and 2.2 percent, respectively. Risks to the forecast are mainly to the downside. Sustained, healthy recovery rests on two rebalancing acts: internal rebalancing, with a strengthening of private demand in advanced economies, allowing for fiscal consolidation; and external rebalancing, with an increase in net exports in deficit countries and a decrease in net exports in surplus countries, notably emerging Asia. The two interact in strong ways. Increased net exports in advanced economies imply higher demand and higher growth, allowing more room for fiscal consolidation. A number of policies are required to support these rebalancing acts. In advanced economies, repair and reform of the financial sector need to accelerate to allow a resumption of healthy credit growth. In addition, fiscal adjustment needs to start in earnest in 2011. Specific plans to cut future budget deficits are urgently needed to create new room for fiscal policy maneuver. If global growth threatens to slow appreciably more than expected, countries with fiscal room could postpone some of the planned consolidation. Meanwhile, key emerging economies will need to further develop domestic sources of growth, with the support of greater exchange rate flexibility.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

The authors of this special feature are Christian Bogmans, Lama Kiyasseh, Akito Matsumoto, Andrea Pescatori (team leader), and Julia Xueliang Wang, with research assistance from Lama Kiyasseh and Claire Mengyi Li.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

The authors of this chapter are Michal Andrle, Philip Barrett, John Bluedorn (co-lead), Francesca Caselli, and Wenjie Chen (co-lead), with support from Christopher Johns, Adrian Robles Villamil, and Shan Wang. The chapter also benefited from discussions with Yuriy Gorodnichenko, Jay Shambaugh, and from comments by January 2020 internal seminar participants and reviewers.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

Global growth slowed again during the second quarter of 2012 after rebounding during the first. The slowing has been observed in all regions. This synchronicity suggests an important role for common factors, many of which reflected wide-ranging spillovers from large country-specific or regional shocks. A first shock was the ratcheting up of financial stress in the euro area periphery in the second quarter. Second, domestic demand in many economies in Asia and Latin America (notably Brazil, China, and India, but also others) slowed, owing not just to weaker external demand from Europe but also to domestic factors. Growth also decelerated in the United States.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

As discussed in Chapter 1, the global recovery is continuing, but its strength is not yet assured. Economic prospects remain uneven across countries and regions (Figure 2.1). In general, the pace of recovery is expected to be faster in economies that had stronger fundamentals before the crisis, smaller output losses during it, and now have more room for policy maneuver and deep links with fast-growing trading partners.1 China’s increasingly wide trading network is driving growth prospects in numerous economies, especially commodity exporters. Strong internal dynamics are supporting near-term growth in other emerging economies, too. However, economic prospects are subdued in major advanced economies, where much-needed policy adjustments have only just begun—in the form of financial sector repair and reform and medium-term fiscal consolidation. This will weigh on growth in emerging economies, raising the need to boost domestic sources of demand. At the same time, capital will continue to flow toward strong emerging and developing economies, induced by relatively good growth prospects and favorable interest rate differentials. This chapter begins with Asia, which is leading the global recovery. Then it turns to North America, where there is renewed concern that the recovery may be stalling, with significant implications for the rest of the world. Next, the chapter reviews Europe’s economic and policy challenges, which in many ways mirror those at the global level: the need for demand rebalancing within the region, financial sector repair, and medium-term fiscal consolidation. It then outlines the wide range of developments and prospects in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and sub-Saharan Africa.

International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.

Abstract

The authors of this chapter are Katharina Bergant, Francesco Grigoli, Niels-Jakob Hansen, and Damiano Sandri (lead), with support from Jungjin Lee and Xiaohui Sun. The chapter benefited from insightful comments by Sebnem Kalemli-Özcan and internal seminar participants.