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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

El Informe Anual a la Junta de Gobernadores pasa revista a las actividades y políticas del FMI durante un ejercicio determinado. Consta de cinco capítulos: 1) Panorama general, 2) Evolución económica y financiera mundial, 3) Políticas para lograr un crecimiento mundial sostenido y equilibrado, 4) Reforma y fortalecimiento del FMI para poder respaldar a los países miembros y 5) Finanzas, organización y rendición de cuentas. Los estados financieros completos correspondientes al ejercicio se publican por separado y también están disponibles, junto con los apéndices y otros materiales complementarios.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

With every twist and turn in the global financial crisis that started in 2007, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has been at the heart of efforts to restore financial stability and return the world economy to sustainable growth. This year was no exception. The Fund was focused intensely on providing the financing, policy advice, and technical assistance that members need to manage economic and financial risks and achieve lasting growth. New nonconcessional financing arrangements were initiated for seven countries. At the same time, the institution was pursuing many strands of work to strengthen its approach to surveillance and policy design, to improve the instruments in its lending toolkit, and to improve the governance structure of the organization.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

After a major setback in late 2011, global economic prospects gradually improved in early 2012, but concerns over the strength of the recovery resurfaced in the second quarter. Stronger activity in the United States and policies in the euro area in response to its deepening economic crisis helped to address the sharp deterioration in financial conditions and boost market confidence in the first few months of 2012. However, downside risks remained elevated at the end of FY2012, and markets were jittery as concerns about sovereign debt in parts of Europe and pressure on the European banking sector resurfaced.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The IMF continued in FY2012 to respond flexibly to members’ financing needs in an environment of heightened global uncertainty. The demand for Fund resources remained strong and commitments increased further, although at a slower pace compared to the previous year.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Faced with lower fiscal buffers than before the onset of the crisis in 2008, and given uncertain prospects for donor assistance in the future, low-income countries remained highly exposed during FY2012 to global shocks. The IMF worked on several fronts to help low-income countries deal with these and other ongoing challenges they face. In addition to the concessional financing the Fund provided to low-income countries during the year, and the additional concessional resources it secured through use of windfall gold sale profits (see Chapter 3), as well as new borrowing agreements signed to support financing for low-income countries (see Chapter 5), the Executive Board took up a number of issues particularly pertinent to low-income countries during the year. Debt issues were addressed in Board reviews of the HIPC Initiative and MDRI, as well as of the IMF–World Bank debt sustainability framework for low-income countries. Additionally, the Board examined ways of managing global growth risks and commodity price shocks in these countries.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Quota subscriptions (see Web Box 5.1) are a major source of the IMF’s financial resources. The IMF’s Board of Governors conducts general quota reviews at regular intervals (at least every five years), allowing the IMF to assess the adequacy of quotas in terms of members’ financing needs and its own ability to help meet those needs, and to modify members’ quotas to reflect changes in their relative positions in the world economy, thus ensuring that the decision-making mechanism of the international financial system evolves with the changing structure of the global economy. The most recent of these reviews, the Fourteenth General Review of Quotas, was concluded in December 2010.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

During the financial year beginning on May 1, 2006, and ending on April 30, 2007, the Executive Board focused on adapting Fund policies and operations to better meet the evolving needs of the IMF’s member countries, whose number increased to 185 in January 2007, when Montenegro joined. Although many of the IMF’s members experienced another year of strong economic growth and favorable market conditions, the economic and financial environment was not without risk. Large global imbalances persisted, the U.S. economy slowed, prices for oil and nonfuel commodities remained high, and investors continued to show a large appetite for risky assets.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The global economy faced a number of challenges during FY2008. As problems in the U.S. subprime mortgage market spilled over into other credit markets, growth prospects slowed in a number of the advanced economies; at the same time, prices for food and oil surged, adding to inflationary pressures worldwide and creating severe hardships for many low-income countries.1 The IMF’s Executive Board—in accordance with the Fund’s core mandate of safeguarding global macroeconomic and financial stability—responded to these developments immediately, strengthening the Fund’s analysis of financial sector issues, recommending policies that could help member countries mitigate the impact of turmoil in financial markets on their economies, and offering policy advice to low-income countries on macroeconomic management in the face of rising costs for food and fuel as well as financial assistance to members in this group experiencing balance of payments problems triggered by the higher cost of imports.2 FY2008 was also a year of reform in the IMF, as the Executive Board moved ahead with measures that will enable the IMF to better meet the evolving needs of its member countries, keep pace with changes in the global economy and financial markets, and adjust to a reduced budgetary envelope.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The course of the global economy in FY2008 was shaped by the interaction of three powerful forces: an escalating financial crisis slowed growth in some of the advanced economies, growth in emerging market and developing economies continued at a brisk pace, and inflationary pressures intensified throughout the world, fueled in part by soaring commodity prices. Overall, global GDP measured at purchasing power parity exchange rates increased by 4.9 percent in 2007—well above trend for the fourth consecutive year (Figure 2.1). From the fourth quarter, however, activity decelerated in the advanced economies, particularly in the United States, where the crisis in the subprime mortgage market affected a broad range of financial markets and institutions. Although growth in emerging market and developing economies also slowed beginning in the fourth quarter of 2007, it remained robust, by historical standards, across all regions.