Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 49 items for :

Clear All
Jack Baranson

This paper discusses the employment of women in developing countries in the light of recent changes in emphasis on the strategy and objectives of economic development. The paper highlights that in the vast majority of countries—both developed and developing—the role of women is still limited and their responsibilities restricted. This paper examines automated manufacturing techniques in developing economies. The operations and transactions of the special drawing account are discussed. The paper also analyzes Latin America’s prospects for overcoming historical attitudes and other constraints to achieve wider economic integration.

International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

Digital technologies offer powerful tools that public administrations can leverage on to modernize and improve their operational efficiency. Bangladesh has progressively embraced GovTech solutions over the past decade and has adopted an ambitious digitalization agenda in the 8th Five-Year Plan (FYP). This note discusses Bangladesh’s digitalization advancements and presents empirical evidence in support of GovTech efforts to improve tax revenue performance, as well as health and education outcomes.

International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept

Around 60 percent of the labor force in Bangladesh is employed in industries at a high risk of automation. Furthermore, automation in advanced economies will lead to the “onshoring” of manufacturing activities that were offshored to other countries. This is a critical time for Bangladesh, and every effort must be made to upgrade the RMG sector and keep it competitive. This includes increasing the technology used in factories, upgrading the skills of workers, and improving logistics, including transportation. Efforts to increase skills are complementary to policies needed in response to automation which center on upgrading the skills of labor through education and training.

Mr. Sakai Ando, Mr. Ravi Balakrishnan, Bertrand Gruss, Mr. Jean-Jacques Hallaert, La-Bhus Fah Jirasavetakul, Koralai Kirabaeva, Nir Klein, Ana Lariau, Lucy Qian Liu, Mr. Davide Malacrino, Mr. Haonan Qu, and Alexandra Solovyeva
In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic caused by far the largest shock to European economies since World War II. Yet, astonishingly, the EU unemployment rate had already declined to its pre-crisis level by 2021Q3, and in some countries the labor force participation rate is at a record high. This paper documents that the widespread use of job retention schemes has played an essential role in mitigating the pandemic’s impact on labor markets and thereby facilitating the restart of European economies after the initial lockdowns.
International Monetary Fund. Communications Department
Finance & Development, June 2018
International Monetary Fund. Communications Department
This paper focuses on smart policies that can alleviate the short-term pain of technological disruption and pave the way for long-term gain. As computing power improves dramatically and more and more people around the world participate in the digital economy, care should be taken about how to devise policies that will allow us to fully exploit the digital revolution’s benefits while minimizing job dislocation. Digital technology will spread further, and efforts to ignore it or legislate against it will likely fail. Even with short-term dislocations, reorganizing the economy around revolutionary technologies generates huge long-term benefits. The digital revolution should be accepted and improved rather than ignored and repressed. Given the global reach of digital technology, and the risk of a race to the bottom, there is a need for policy cooperation like that of global financial markets and sea and air traffic. The history of earlier general-purpose technologies demonstrates that even with short-term dislocations, reorganizing the economy around revolutionary technologies generates huge long-term benefits.
International Monetary Fund. Communications Department
Finance & Development, June 2018