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International Monetary Fund

This paper reviews the progress report on implementation of the National Strategy for Socio-Economic Development (NSSED) during 2004 in Albania. The NSSED established a multiyear plan to combat poverty and strengthen governance. The main implication of the Integrated Planning System for the NSSED is that it will evolve into a comprehensive strategic planning framework. Its focus will accordingly shift toward medium to long-term planning, ensuring that a coherent, costed, mutually consistent sector and cross-cutting strategies are developed that serve as the policy basis for the annual Medium-Term Budget Program process.

International Monetary Fund

In October 2006, the Chadian government prepared a second National Poverty Reduction Strategy (NPRS2). NPRS2 analyzed poverty in Chad, reviewed the results of the first NPRS and progress toward the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), defined the strategic pillars of the second strategy, examined two key scenarios for poverty reduction and growth, and described the institutional framework for implementation of the strategy. The government considers NPRS2 as the main instrument for achieving the MDGs in Chad, and therefore the preferred framework for socioeconomic development.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper discusses the appointment of A. W. Clausen as the new World Bank president. Mr. Clausen, 57, joined the Bank of America in 1949 as a trainee just out of the University of Minnesota law school and rose to become president of the San Francisco-based institution 21 years later. His career at the Bank of America spanned 31 years, and he played an important role in the bank’s expansion in the United States and overseas. Mr. Clausen has been bestowed many honors, including the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper highlights that despite severe limitations of resources, developing countries have made substantial progress during the past three decades in sending more children to school and in generally improving their education systems. Enrollment of children in schools at all levels has expanded at unprecedented rates. There has been a significant decline in the proportion of adults who are illiterate—from 44 percent in 1950 to 32 percent in 1975. Public expenditures for education have increased steadily in developing countries to reach roughly the same share of national product as in industrialized countries.