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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper highlights that the IMF, as Trustee for the Trust Fund, held the first of its series of gold auctions on June 2, 1976, with the sale of 780,000 ounces of gold—the total amount offered—at a common price of US$126.00 a fine ounce. The first gold auction was a success from the point of view of both the market and the IMF. In all, a total of 25 million ounces of gold from the IMF’s holdings will be sold at auction over a four-year period.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper discusses the launch of the Brandt Commission. The paper highlights that during the week of the Annual Meetings of the Board of Governors of the World Bank and the IMF in Washington, D.C. (September 26–30, 1977), Willy Brandt, former Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany, announced that he would head an independent commission that would identify “ways of restructuring international relations that would command the widest possible support.” The Commission will have about 15 members, both from developed and developing countries.

Pushpa Nand Schwartz

This paper highlights that 1977 was an eventful year for the IMF. Drawing on the IMF’s resources during 1977 totaled more than SDR 3.4 billion. These were accompanied by a record volume of repurchases, which reduced the total net drawings for the year to SDR 427 million. At the end of 1977, total net drawings on the IMF since its inception were equivalent to about SDR 15.5 billion. In 1977, the IMF also carried out its gold sales to members at SDR 35 per ounce under the IMF’s “restitution” program.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper reviews the procurement process under World Bank projects. The paper highlights that the World Bank’s interest in procurement under its loans stems directly from the “project” requirement of its Articles, which stipulates that it should lend for specific projects, except in special circumstances, and that it should ensure that the proceeds of the loan are used only for its specified purpose, with due attention to economy and efficiency. In 1951, the World Bank began introducing international competitive bidding as the normal procedure for procurement of the goods and works needed for its projects.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.

Mitchell A. Seligson and John T. Passé-Smith

For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.

Deena R. Khatkhate

What about the flow of well-educated people from less developed countries to richer countries? The author puts forth the view that—sometimes at least—it alleviates social and economic stresses in some of the “losing” countries.

Michael A. Cohen

How will national and local planners face the challenge posed by urban growth in the less developed world? The author outlines the extent of the problem and some methods of tackling it.

H. David Davis

At the invitation of the Moroccan Government, a World Bank mission has surveyed the national economy and made suggestions for its future.