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International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
Nigeria undertook a Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP), which included a review of the structure of Nigeria’s insurance market and the supervisory framework. The assessment was benchmarked against the Insurance Core Principles (ICPs) issued by the International Association of Insurance Supervisors (IAISs). It is advised that the National Insurance Commission (NAICOM) of Nigeria can expand the objective to include the creation of a fair, safe, and stable insurance sector for the benefit and protection of policyholders.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Detailed Assessment of the Observance of the Insurance Core Principles for Denmark. Key recommendations arising from the assessment cover two main issues. First is the fact that the Danish Financial Supervisory Authority Finanstilsynet bases its system to assess the appropriateness of key functions on the assumption that it is the core responsibility of the senior management to ensure adequate personnel to be assigned to relevant tasks in the supervised companies. The second issue relates to a requirement that internal audit functions should be made compulsory for smaller companies.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews key findings of the detailed assessment of the Observance of Standards and Codes in the Financial Sector of the Cayman Islands. Banks in the Cayman Islands operate within a well-defined prudential regulatory framework, generally in accordance with Basel standards, that is, largely modeled after the framework currently in use in the United Kingdom. The two-tiered required minimum risk capital standards are significantly above those required by the Basel Capital Accord and are applied in practice based primarily on the perceived differences in risk related to bank ownership.
International Monetary Fund
This review of financial sector regulation and supervision in the Kingdom of the Netherlands—Netherlands Antilles explains banking, insurance, and pension fund supervision. The Netherlands Antilles is resolved to remove the perception created by placement of the jurisdiction in the weakest category of the list of offshore financial centers, published by the Financial Stability Forum (FSF). Bank of the Netherlands Antilles (BNA) staff is highly capable, well-trained, and dedicated, and is able to attract appropriate personnel and material resources to perform its functions.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department
This paper discusses findings and recommendations of the Report on Observance of Standards and codes for Ireland. The Central Bank of Ireland (CBI) is the integrated financial supervisor in Ireland. As the primary regulator of the Irish financial system, CBI has overall responsibility for the supervision of insurers and insurance intermediaries authorized in Ireland. The authorities need to address the significant challenges faced by CBI in attracting and retaining supervisors and to enhance the CBI’s independence. CBI is also advised to review the supervisory risk appetite underpinning Probability Risk Impact Supervisory System, including potential reputational risks.
International Monetary Fund
This paper highlights key finding of the assessment of financial sector regulation and supervision in Belize. The assessment reveals that banking supervision in Belize complies with or is largely compliant with most of the Basel Core Principles. Under current arrangements, the Minister retains a good deal of discretionary authority with respect to banking supervision, but this situation is likely to be modified if a draft bill, now under discussion, becomes law. Retention of qualified staff is a continuous problem with the result that the intensity of banking supervision varies.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Detailed Assessment of Observance of International Association of Insurance Supervisors (IAIS) Insurance Core Principles for the United States. Most U.S. insurers write primary insurance on U.S. risks. The U.S. market is characterized by low market concentration in most sectors, indicating a high degree of competition. Overall, the insurance sector, and the property and casualty companies in particular, has been resilient through the financial crisis. However, there have also been significant stresses in the insurance sector in the last two years.
International Monetary Fund
This paper presents a Detailed Assessment of the Isle of Man’s (IOM) observance of the Insurance Core Principles. Regulation has been strengthened since the 2003 Offshore Financial Center assessment. The Insurance and Pension Authority has been putting in place Memorandums of Understanding with home regulators and is exchanging information extensively. After rapid growth in 2005 and 2006, new business volumes and investment performance have been adversely affected by weaker global equity markets. The number of captives established in the IOM has fallen, reflecting competition from jurisdictions within the European Union.
International Monetary Fund
The financial regulatory and supervisory system of the Isle of Man complies well with the assessed international standards. Volume I of this report provides an overview and summary findings. Volume II provides the detailed findings of the assessments of compliance with the Basel Core Principles for Effective Banking Supervision (BCP); the Insurance Core Principles of the International Association of Insurance Supervisors (IAIS); and the Objectives and Principles of Securities Regulation of the International Organization of Securities Commissions (IOSCO).
International Monetary Fund
The Australian banking system, which holds approximately half of total financial systems assets, and is dominated by four major banks, is sound with high earnings, high asset growth, and low levels of problem assets. Stress tests did not reveal near-term stability concerns, suggesting the banking system is likely to be resilient to adverse shocks. Australia’s financial supervisory structure of prudential authority and market conduct authority is sound overall. The medium-term challenges facing the banking sector are opportunities for growth and pressure on profitability.