Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 28 items for :

  • International Economics x
  • Asia and Pacific x
  • Real sector x
  • Liquidity; Economics x
  • Finance & Development x
  • Environment x
  • Cross-cutting issues x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund

Climate change is the defining challenge of our time, and the stakes are particularly high for the Asia-Pacific region. Temperatures are rising two times faster in Asia than the global average, which is associated with the increased frequency and severity of weather-related natural disasters. In 2019 alone, India was buffeted by a severe heat wave that led to water scarcity in parts of the country. Torrential rains in South Asia caused large-scale population displacement, while water levels in the Mekong Delta fell to unprecedented lows due to intense dry weather. Australia faced historic bushfires fueled by a particularly harsh dry season. And more than 25 tropical cyclones wreaked damage on the Pacific and Indian Ocean coasts. Such climate hazards are projected to intensify in the period ahead.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper highlights that despite severe limitations of resources, developing countries have made substantial progress during the past three decades in sending more children to school and in generally improving their education systems. Enrollment of children in schools at all levels has expanded at unprecedented rates. There has been a significant decline in the proportion of adults who are illiterate—from 44 percent in 1950 to 32 percent in 1975. Public expenditures for education have increased steadily in developing countries to reach roughly the same share of national product as in industrialized countries.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper highlights that since its inception in 1956, the International Finance Corporation (IFC) has invested more than US$1.7 billion in nearly 300 enterprises in 62 developing countries in total projects costing about US$9 billion. The IFC is the affiliate of the World Bank, which has been given the specific task of furthering economic development by encouraging the growth of productive private enterprise in developing countries. The paper underscores that IFC plays an essentially catalytic role in generating investment funds from local and foreign sources.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.

Albert Waterston, David Williams, and Robert F. Skillings

• Singer, H. W., International Development: Growth and Change, New York, N.Y., U.S.A., McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1964, xiv + 295 pp., $7.50; • Bhagwati, Jagdish, The Economics of Underdeveloped Countries, New York, N.Y., U.S.A., McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1966, 254 pp., $2.45; • Birmingham, W., and A. G. Ford (Eds.), Planning and Growth in Rich and Poor Countries, New York, N.Y., U.S.A., Frederick A. Praeger, 1966, 267 pp., $7.50; • Horowitz, Irving Louis, Three Worlds of Development: The Theory and Practice of International Stratification, New York, N.Y., U.S.A., Oxford University Press, 1966, xiv + 475 pp., $8.50; • Fryer, D. W., World Economic Development, New York, N.Y., U.S.A., McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965, xi + 627 pp., $8.95; • Scott, Andrew M., with William A. Lucas and Trudi M. Lucas, Simulation and National Development, New York, N.Y., U.S.A., John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1966, ix + 177 pp., $5.95.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.

This paper reviews the population policy in developed countries. The paper highlights that despite the weakness of population concerns in most developed countries compared with less-developed countries, most of the former have taken certain actions that affect, or are thought to affect, demographic events. These actions include such measures as appointing official commissions to study the country’s demographic situation and advise the government what to do; providing birth control services as part of the public health system; and so on. This paper also summarizes the conclusions drawn by Dr. Berelson from the 25 country reports.