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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

En los últimos años, el FMI ha participado activamente en iniciativas de cooperación internacional para evitar el abuso de los sistemas financieros nacionales y proteger y mejorar la integridad del sistema financiero internacional. Más allá de los esfuerzos por combatir el lavado de dinero, el FMI ha aplicado su participación también a la lucha contra el financiamiento del terrorismo. Este manual facilitará la prestación de asistencia técnica pertinente al proporcionar un compendio de materiales esenciales para los funcionarios que tienen a su cargo la redacción de leyes de represión de estas actividades de financiamiento. Se presentan las normas y obligaciones internacionales pertinentes, junto con ejemplos de la legislación vigente orientada a cumplir con dichas normas y obligaciones. Los temas tratados en este libro son relevantes para todos los países, independientemente de su situación geopolítica.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

IMF member countries and other jurisdictions wishing to bring their legislation up to the norms and standards established by the international community in the area of combating the financing of terrorism face a number of choices. The sources of these norms and standards range from legally binding international norms, such as those contained in resolutions of the United Nations (UN) Security Council, and in international conventions, such as the International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism, to nonbinding standards established by groups of countries acting in concert, such as the Eight Special Recommendations on Terrorism Financing of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF). While there is considerable overlap among these sources, their scope varies. Implementation of some of the norms and standards requires legislation, but on many points, implementation can be effected in a number of different ways. As a result, in responding to their international obligations and meeting the standards, countries must make a number of choices as to the scope of the legislation and its contents.

Jean-François Thony

Abstract

1.1. Countries recognize that strong regional and international cooperation on cross-border transactions, including the implementation of best practices concerning information sharing in criminal matters, are needed if they are to be successful in combating money laundering (ML) and the financing of terrorism (FT).

Rochelle A. Deleveaux

Abstract

1.1. The Commonwealth of The Bahamas is a sovereign nation, with a population of just over 300,000, lying southeast of the United States. There are some 30 inhabited islands out of a total of around 700. The two most populated are New Providence (with the capital, Nassau) and Grand Bahama.

Giuseppe Godano

Abstract

1.1. Market integration increases the need for information exchange among supervisory authorities. Even if many supervisory issues are discussed in multilateral forums, information is generally exchanged between two authorities and it is therefore important to establish bilateral contacts.

Ethiopis Tafara

Abstract

1.1. The ability to protect domestic securities markets turns on the ability to obtain and provide international cooperation. Capital markets today are increasingly global because transactions transcend national boundaries with greater frequency and speed; public companies raise capital beyond their geographic boundaries; and investors trade outside their countries. Fraudsters are equally unconstrained by borders; they engage in illegal conduct in a multitude of jurisdictions, often simultaneously, and they transfer illegal proceeds to numerous jurisdictions in an effort to evade detection and prosecution. This globalization of fraud is a critical issue for every securities regulator, because illegal conduct that goes without detection or prosecution affects each and every one of our markets. It affects the confidence of our investors and their willingness to invest, and it affects capital formation. And, if aspects of the illegal activity can occur within any of our borders, without fear of detection, we can be assured that those who are inclined to engage in fraud will migrate to these vulnerable markets.

Jacqueline Wilson

Abstract

1.1. The British Virgin Islands (BVI) Financial Services Commission (FSC) is the authority that is responsible for regulating financial services business that is carried on in or from within the BVI. This includes banking and trust company business, company management business, mutual fund business, and insurance business.