Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 277 items for :

Clear All
Mrs. Harinder K Malothra, Mr. Milan M Cuc, Mr. Ulrich Bartsch, and Mr. Menachem Katz

Abstract

While it may not be possible to identify an “optimal” fiscal policy for oil countries in general, the discussions in the previous section provide important issues for consideration by policymakers. In this section, we present some operational issues to help in the design of schemes for the use of oil revenue. This subsection presents (1) the case for a rule-based fiscal policy and (2) possible fiscal rules, including two “extremes” to be used as guideposts for the possible range of expenditure profiles.

Mrs. Harinder K Malothra, Mr. Milan M Cuc, Mr. Ulrich Bartsch, and Mr. Menachem Katz

Abstract

Oil-exporting countries have used a variety of exchange rate arrangements, as shown in Figure 9. At the end of 2001, about 18 of the 29 oil-producing IMF member countries (excluding the former Soviet bloc countries) used some form of fixed exchange rate regime, while 11 opted for either managed or independent floating. This suggests that, in practice, the choice of an exchange rate arrangement is not a straightforward exercise; instead, exchange rate policy has to be based on country-specific considerations, including the relative openness of the economy, in terms of both current and capital accounts, and the relative prevalence of real or nominal shocks. Exchange rate policy will also have to take into account the monetary policy and institutional framework in which it is set.18 This subsection describes first general considerations, then potential advantages of flexible exchange rates, and finally policies in support of fixed exchange rates.