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International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

Against the backdrop of lackluster global growth in 2016, the world economy is seeing underlying shifts in its economic and policy landscape. Since last October, the outlook for advanced economies for 2017–18 has improved, reflecting better growth prospects in the United States, Europe, and Japan—alongside some rebound in manufacturing and trade and likely U.S. fiscal stimulus. With the anticipated change in the U.S. policy mix, including faster monetary tightening and a stronger U.S. dollar, market sentiment in advanced economies has improved and equity markets have been buoyant. Domestic financial conditions initially tightened in emerging markets, where growth prospects have worsened slightly, but market conditions have since noticeably improved. On balance, global growth is expected to rise modestly in 2017 and 2018 but with widely dispersed risks around this baseline. Longer-term uncertainty surrounds the direction and extent of shifts in U.S. policies. Global vulnerabilities include a rising tide of economic nationalism in major advanced economies—marked by higher antipathy toward trade, immigration, and globalization.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

Abstract

Against the backdrop of lackluster global growth in 2016, the world economy is seeing underlying shifts in its economic and policy landscape. Since last October, the outlook for advanced economies for 2017–18 has improved, reflecting better growth prospects in the United States, Europe, and Japan—alongside some rebound in manufacturing and trade and likely U.S. fiscal stimulus. With the anticipated change in the U.S. policy mix, including faster monetary tightening and a stronger U.S. dollar, market sentiment in advanced economies has improved and equity markets have been buoyant. Domestic financial conditions initially tightened in emerging markets, where growth prospects have worsened slightly, but market conditions have since noticeably improved. On balance, global growth is expected to rise modestly in 2017 and 2018 but with widely dispersed risks around this baseline. Longer-term uncertainty surrounds the direction and extent of shifts in U.S. policies. Global vulnerabilities include a rising tide of economic nationalism in major advanced economies—marked by higher antipathy toward trade, immigration, and globalization.

Mr. R. B. Johnston

Abstract

The First International Conference on Hawala, hosted by the government of the United Arab Emirates under the leadership of the Central Bank of the U.A.E. in May 2002, was a groundbreaking event that produced the Abu Dhabi Declaration on Hawala. The IMF was very pleased that the government of the U.A.E., again with the leadership of the Central Bank, collaborated with the IMF to organize this second conference.

Charles Lengalenga

Abstract

The Eastern and Southern Africa Anti–Money Laundering Group (ESAAMLG) was conceived in 1999 and is a Financial Action Task Force–style (FATF-style) regional body with a membership of 14 countries—Botswana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

Mohamed Djirdeh Houssein

Abstract

On behalf of the Somali people, I would like to take this occasion to thank H.H. Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the President of the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.); Their Highnesses, the members of the Supreme Council; and the government and the people of the U.A.E. for their generous hospitality in accommodating such a big community of Somalis who live and work in their country. The U.A.E. has been our second home for a long time and especially during the past 14 years since the state of Somalia collapsed.

Nikos Passas

Abstract

Hawala means “transfer” in Arabic and refers to a traditional informal and efficient funds transfer method used by millions of expatriates to send remittances to their families around the world. Several studies emphasize hawala’s economic and humanitarian significance. In the midst of calls to shut down all potential means used by militants to finance their terror, the First International Conference on Hawala, held in 2002 in Abu Dhabi, was successful in offering an opportunity to examine hawala beyond media sensationalism and rushed policy responses.