Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 88 items for :

  • Islamic Banking and Finance x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

Abstract

The MENAP oil exporters were directly affected by the global financial crisis through a sharp drop in oil prices, a contraction in the global economy, and a sudden drying up of capital inflows. Although activity in the oil sector will likely drop by 3.5 percent in 2009, strong countercyclical macroeconomic policies have helped mitigate the impact of the crisis on the non-oil sector, which is projected to grow by 3.2 percent. Looking ahead, higher oil prices, a revival of global demand, and continued government spending will provide the basis for stronger growth in 2010. The crisis also revealed some vulnerabilities in the banking and corporate sectors, requiring countries to undertake exceptional stabilization measures and highlighting the need to strengthen financial sector supervision, enhance corporate governance, foster resource mobilization, and diversify risks.

International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

Abstract

The MENAP oil importers are a diverse group, encompassing both emerging and low-income economies. Many have seen significant slowdowns in the past year but, overall, these countries have escaped the substantial contractions experienced in other parts of the world. Supportive policy responses, a low degree of integration with international capital markets and manufacturing supply chains, and banking systems that had little exposure to structured financial products have contained the fallout. While the slowdown has been modest, this group of countries is also likely to experience a slow recovery. Limited external financing, little space for fiscal stimulus, a real appreciation of most domestic currencies, sluggish receipts from tourism and remittances, and higher energy prices will all continue to be a drag on growth for some time.

International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept.

Abstract

For many countries in the Caucasus and Central Asia (CCA) region, the impact of the global economic downturn has been severe, but prospects for energy importers and exporters differ starkly. For energy importers, the economic outlook remains challenging and recovery in 2010 is likely to be gradual, primarily because of their linkages with Russia. In particular, remittances have fallen sharply, hurting low-income households. Fiscal policy should remain accommodative in 2010 to support growth and mitigate the impact on the poor, but continued concessional donor support will be needed to prevent a buildup of unsustainable debt levels.

International Monetary Fund, World Bank, International Monetary Fund. Strategy, Policy, &, Review Department, International Monetary Fund. African Dept., International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept., International Monetary Fund. Middle East and Central Asia Dept., and International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

This paper provides a proposal to incorporate the Core Principles for Islamic Finance Regulation (Banking Sector) issued by the Islamic Financial Services Board

Ms. May Y Khamis, Mr. Abdelhak S Senhadji, Mr. Gabriel Sensenbrenner, Mr. Francis Y Kumah, Maher Hasan, and Mr. Ananthakrishnan Prasad
This paper focuses on impact of the global financial crisis on the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Countries and challenges ahead. The oil price boom led to large fiscal and external balance surpluses in the GCC countries. However, it also generated domestic imbalances that began to unravel with the onset of the global credit squeeze. As the global deleveraging process took hold, and oil prices and production fell, the GCC’s external and fiscal surpluses declined markedly, stock and real estate markets plunged, credit default swap spreads on sovereign debt widened, and external funding for the financial and corporate sectors tightened. In order to offset the shocks brought on by the crisis, governments—buttressed by strong international reserve positions—maintained high levels of spending and introduced exceptional financial measures, including capital and liquidity injections. The immediate priority is to complete the clean-up of bank balance sheets and the restructuring of the nonbanking sector in some countries. Clear communication by the authorities would help implementation, ease investor uncertainty, and reduce speculation and market volatility.
Maher Hasan and Mr. Jemma Dridi

This paper examines the performance of Islamic banks (IBs) and conventional banks (CBs) during the recent global crisis by looking at the impact of the crisis on profitability, credit and asset growth, and external ratings in a group of countries where the two types of banks have significant market share. Our analysis suggests that IBs have been affected differently than CBs. Factors related to IBs‘ business model helped limit the adverse impact on profitability in 2008, while weaknesses in risk management practices in some IBs led to a larger decline in profitability in 2009 compared to CBs. IBs‘ credit and asset growth performed better than did that of CBs in 2008-09, contributing to financial and economic stability. External rating agencies‘ re-assessment of IBs‘ risk was generally more favorable.

International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Esta edición de F&D se enfoca en la importancia creciente de los mercados emergentes. En el análisis realizado por Ayhan Kose, del FMI y Eswar Prasad, profesor de política comercial de la Universidad de Cornell, se sostiene que el surgimiento económico de estos mercados permitirá a Brasil, China, India y Rusia influir más en el gobierno de la economía mundial y asumir más responsabilidad con respecto a la estabilidad económica y financiera. Y Vivek Arora y Athanasios Vamvakidis evalúan cómo la economía de China afecta no solo a sus vecinos y socios comerciales sino también, cada vez más, al resto del mundo. En F&D se examinan además diversos temas relacionados en particular con el esfuerzo que se está realizando a escala mundial para dejar atrás la crisis. Alan Blinder y Mark Zandi consideran los efectos positivos del estímulo aplicado en Estados Unidos. Sin este estímulo, sostienen que Estados Unidos todavía estaría en recesión. Investigadores del FMI analizan cómo los países pueden controlar la deuda y qué sucede cuando se rebaja la calificación de la deuda pública de un país. En otros artículos se examinan el costo humano del desempleo, cómo la desigualdad puede desembocar con el tiempo en una crisis financiera y el impacto de la reforma bancaria en el sistema financiero. Dos artículos abordan el tema de los bancos islámicos, que durante la reciente crisis mundial demostraron su capacidad de resistencia, y en El rostro de la crisis seguimos relatando cómo la recesión afectó a distintas personas en el mundo. En la sección de F&D titulada “Gente del mundo de la economía” se traza una semblanza del economista teórico Avinash Dixit y en “Vuelta a lo esencial” se examinan las externalidades.