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International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The first Millennium Development Goal (MDG) calls for the development community to reduce the global rate of extreme income poverty—measured by the share of the population living on less than $1 per day—by half between 1990 and 2015. Current trends suggest that if the developing world can maintain the growth momentum of the past 15 years, it will meet this MDG. Numerically, the reduction in the global poverty rate owes the most to impressive advances in China and India, but it has also been helped by acceleration in income growth elsewhere in the developing world in recent years. The past year has seen strong growth and poverty reduction in much of the developing world as a result of improved developing-country policies and a global environment conducive to growth.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The first Millennium Development Goal (MDG) calls for the development community to reduce the global rate of extreme income poverty—measured by the share of the population living on less than $1 per day—by half between 1990 and 2015. Current trends suggest that if the developing world can maintain the growth momentum of the past 15 years, it will meet this MDG. Numerically, the reduction in the global poverty rate owes the most to impressive advances in China and India, but it has also been helped by acceleration in income growth elsewhere in the developing world in recent years. The past year has seen strong growth and poverty reduction in much of the developing world as a result of improved developing-country policies and a global environment conducive to growth.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Under the first Millennium Development Goal (MDG1), the international community aims to halve the global rate of extreme income poverty—as measured by the share of the population living on less than $1 per day—between 1990 and 2015. Current trends and growth forecasts indicate that this goal will be achieved, although not in Sub-Saharan Africa. High growth in China and India explains much of the reduction in the global poverty rate, although progress toward MDG1 has also quickened in many other developing countries. High growth has continued in most of the developing world in the past year as a result of better policies in developing countries and a favorable global environment. The outlook for growth and poverty reduction remains favorable, although some risks remain. In particular, low-income country per capita growth is expected to remain above 5 percent in 2007.1

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Under the first Millennium Development Goal (MDG1), the international community aims to halve the global rate of extreme income poverty—as measured by the share of the population living on less than $1 per day—between 1990 and 2015. Current trends and growth forecasts indicate that this goal will be achieved, although not in Sub-Saharan Africa. High growth in China and India explains much of the reduction in the global poverty rate, although progress toward MDG1 has also quickened in many other developing countries. High growth has continued in most of the developing world in the past year as a result of better policies in developing countries and a favorable global environment. The outlook for growth and poverty reduction remains favorable, although some risks remain. In particular, low-income country per capita growth is expected to remain above 5 percent in 2007.1

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

What is the human cost of the global economic crisis? How many people will the crisis prevent from escaping poverty, and how many will remain hungry? How many more infants will die? Are children being pulled out of schools, making it virtually impossible to reach 100 percent completion in primary education by 2015? What are the gender dimensions of the impacts? These are some of the questions as the global economy comes out of the worst recession since the Great Depression.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

What is the human cost of the global economic crisis? How many people will the crisis prevent from escaping poverty, and how many will remain hungry? How many more infants will die? Are children being pulled out of schools, making it virtually impossible to reach 100 percent completion in primary education by 2015? What are the gender dimensions of the impacts? These are some of the questions as the global economy comes out of the worst recession since the Great Depression.