Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 957 items for :

  • Annual Report of the Executive Board x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

International Monetary Fund Annual Report 2020

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

One of the core responsibilities of the International Monetary Fund is to maintain a dialogue with its member countries on the national and international consequences of their economic and financial policies. This process of monitoring and consultation, referred to as surveillance, is mandated under Article IV of the IMF’s Articles of Agreement and lies at the heart of the Fund’s efforts to prevent crises.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The IMF remains central to efforts to restore the global economy to a robust and sustained growth path. The institution’s work during FY20111 focused on providing policy advice and technical support to member countries to help achieve this goal, meeting the financing needs of countries to support their adjustment efforts, including through programs in Greece, Ireland, and Portugal (the latter in early FY2012), putting in place systems that will strengthen the institution’s ability to identify and respond to global economic risks as they emerge, and working on reforms that will strengthen the international monetary system.

International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

The period from May 2013 through April 2014—the IMF’s financial year 20141—saw the world economy reach a critical juncture: emerging from the greatest financial crisis in almost a hundred years. Recovery was taking hold but was too slow and faced many obstacles along the road. In her Global Policy Agenda, the IMF’s Managing Director set out bold policy steps that could overcome these obstacles and take the global economy toward more rapid and sustainable growth. The top priority was to strengthen the coherence of the policies and cooperation among policymakers, both at home and across borders: national prosperity and global prosperity are linked and depend, more than ever before, on countries working together. The IMF is indispensable for this global cooperation.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

With every twist and turn in the global financial crisis that started in 2007, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has been at the heart of efforts to restore financial stability and return the world economy to sustainable growth. This year was no exception. The Fund was focused intensely on providing the financing, policy advice, and technical assistance that members need to manage economic and financial risks and achieve lasting growth. New nonconcessional financing arrangements were initiated for seven countries. At the same time, the institution was pursuing many strands of work to strengthen its approach to surveillance and policy design, to improve the instruments in its lending toolkit, and to improve the governance structure of the organization.

International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

The period from May 2012 through April 2013—the IMF’s financial year 20131—saw the world dealing with the prolonged effects of a global crisis that had persisted well beyond initial expectations in an atmosphere of heightened global change. With economic activity remaining weak and the potential for renewed stresses still high, efforts to advance global stability and a secure future were as essential as ever.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

As FY2010 drew to a close,1 the global economy appeared to be emerging from the worst recession in over 60 years. The recovery remained uneven, however, with some economies growing very robustly, while others were experiencing more tepid rebounds, and downside risks were increasing-and continued to do so in early FY2011. Policies are needed to address these risks and set the stage for a return to strong and sustained global growth.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The past year has been a roller coaster for the global economy.4 The severe financial crisis that followed the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008 had a significant negative effect on the world economy, with global output falling by ½ percent in 2009. Advanced economies were the most significantly affected by the financial crisis, having to deal with a serious credit crunch, battered balance sheets, and rising unemployment. In these countries, output fell by 3¼ percent in 2009. The crisis was transmitted swiftly across the globe through a number of channels-including a collapse in trade, a drying up of capital flows, and a drop in remittances. When the dust had settled, it became obvious that several emerging markets and low-income countries had been severely affected by the global crisis, the worst in over 60 years.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

After suffering the first contraction since World War II in 2009, the global economy staged a strong recovery in 2010, with world GDP growing by 5 percent. However, the pace of activity remained geographically uneven, with employment lagging. Economic performance during 2010 was a tale of two halves. During the first half of the year, the recovery was driven by the rebuilding of depleted inventories, which fostered a sharp rebound in industrial production and trade. Supportive macro-economic policies also played an important role. During the second half, as the inventory cycle leveled off and fiscal consolidation loomed in many advanced economies, fears of a double-dip recession increased. In the end, reduced excess capacity, accommodative policies, and further improvements in confidence and financial conditions bolstered private demand, making the recovery more self-sustaining. Investment was in the lead, though consumption also regained strength.