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Mr. David Coady, Ian Parry, Nghia-Piotr Le, and Baoping Shang
This paper updates estimates of fossil fuel subsidies, defined as fuel consumption times the gap between existing and efficient prices (i.e., prices warranted by supply costs, environmental costs, and revenue considerations), for 191 countries. Globally, subsidies remained large at $4.7 trillion (6.3 percent of global GDP) in 2015 and are projected at $5.2 trillion (6.5 percent of GDP) in 2017. The largest subsidizers in 2015 were China ($1.4 trillion), United States ($649 billion), Russia ($551 billion), European Union ($289 billion), and India ($209 billion). About three quarters of global subsidies are due to domestic factors—energy pricing reform thus remains largely in countries’ own national interest—while coal and petroleum together account for 85 percent of global subsidies. Efficient fossil fuel pricing in 2015 would have lowered global carbon emissions by 28 percent and fossil fuel air pollution deaths by 46 percent, and increased government revenue by 3.8 percent of GDP.
Mr. David Coady, Ian W.H. Parry, Louis Sears, and Baoping Shang
This paper provides a comprehensive, updated picture of energy subsidies at the global and regional levels. It focuses on the broad notion of post-tax energy subsidies, which arise when consumer prices are below supply costs plus a tax to reflect environmental damage and an additional tax applied to all consumption goods to raise government revenues. Post-tax energy subsidies are dramatically higher than previously estimated, and are projected to remain high. These subsidies primarily reflect under-pricing from a domestic (rather than global) perspective, so even unilateral price reform is in countries’ own interests. The potential fiscal, environmental and welfare impacts of energy subsidy reform are substantial.
Mr. Benjamin L Hunt, Mr. Dirk V Muir, and Mr. Martin Sommer
This paper uses two of the IMF's structural macroeconomic models to estimate the potential global impact of the boom in unconventional oil and natural gas in the United States. The results suggest that the impact on the level of U.S. real GDP over roughly the next decade could be significant, but modest, ranging between 1 and 1½ percent. Further, while the impact on the U.S. energy trade balance will be large, most results suggest that its impact on the overall U.S. current account will be negligible. The impact outside of the United States will be modestly positive on average, but most countries dependent on energy exports will be affected adversely.
Mr. Benedict J. Clements, Mr. David Coady, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Mr. Sanjeev Gupta, Mr. Trevor Serge Coleridge Alleyne, and Mr. Carlo A Sdralevich

Abstract

Los subsidios a la energía tienen consecuencias económicas de amplio alcance. A pesar de que tienen por objeto proteger a los consumidores, los subsidios agravan los desequilibrios fiscales, desplazan gastos públicos prioritarios y deprimen la inversión privada, en particular en el sector de la energía. Los subsidios también distorsionan la asignación de recursos al promover un consumo excesivo de energía, estimular artificialmente industrias que requieren un uso intensivo de capital, reducir los incentivos a la inversión en energías renovables y acelerar el agotamiento de los recursos naturales. Los hogares de mayores ingresos son en definitiva los principales beneficiarios de los subsidios, con lo cual se agudiza la desigualdad. Incluso las generaciones futuras se ven afectadas por los efectos perjudiciales de un aumento del consumo de energía a través del calentamiento global. Este libro ofrece 1) las estimaciones más completas de los subsidios a la energía disponibles en la actualidad con respecto a 176 países y 2) un análisis de cómo realizar la reforma de los subsidios a la energía, a partir de las conclusiones extraídas de 22 estudios de casos realizados por el personal técnico del FMI y de análisis llevados a cabo por otras instituciones.

Mr. Benedict J. Clements, Mr. David Coady, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Mr. Sanjeev Gupta, Mr. Trevor Serge Coleridge Alleyne, and Mr. Carlo A Sdralevich

Abstract

Les subventions à l'énergie ont des conséquences économiques très variées. Leur but est de protéger les consommateurs, mais elles exacerbent les déséquilibres budgétaires, évincent les dépenses publiques prioritaires et dépriment l'investissement privé, notamment dans le secteur de l'énergie. Les subventions faussent en outre l'affectation des ressources, car elles encouragent une consommation excessive d'énergie, favorisent artificiellement les industries à forte intensité de capital, réduisent les incitations à investir dans les énergies renouvelables et accélèrent l'épuisement des ressources naturelles. La plupart des avantages liés aux subventions reviennent aux ménages dont le revenu est plus élevé, ce qui accentue les inégalités. Même les générations futures sont touchées, car elles subiront les effets négatifs de l'accroissement de la consommation énergétique sur le réchauffement de la planète. Cet ouvrage offre 1) les estimations les plus exhaustives sur les subventions énergétiques en s’appuyant sur les données recueillies dans 176 pays et 2) une analyse des modalités de réforme des subventions à l'énergie qui s'inspire des conclusions de 22 études de cas nationales menées par le FMI et d'analyses entreprises par d’autres institutions.

Mr. Benedict J. Clements, Mr. David Coady, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Mr. Sanjeev Gupta, Mr. Trevor Serge Coleridge Alleyne, and Mr. Carlo A Sdralevich

Abstract

Energy subsidies have wide-ranging economic consequences. Although they are aimed at protecting consumers, subsidies aggravate fiscal imbalances, crowd out priority public spending, and depress private investment, including in the energy sector. Subsidies also distort resource allocation by encouraging excessive energy consumption, artificially promoting capital-intensive industries, reducing incentives for investment in renewable energy, and accelerating the depletion of natural resources. Most subsidy benefits are captured by higher-income households, reinforcing inequality. Even future generations are affected through the damaging effects of increased energy consumption on global warming. This book provides (1) the most comprehensive estimates of energy subsidies currently available for 176 countries and (2) an analysis of “how to do” energy subsidy reform, drawing on insights from 22 country case studies undertaken by the IMF staff and analyses carried out by other institutions.

International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

This 2013 Article IV Consultation highlights that the economy of Trinidad and Tobago is poised for a modest recovery in 2013, after disappointing growth in 2012 that was owing to largely supply constraints, including maintenance operations in the energy sector and an industrial dispute in the nonenergy sector. The IMF staff projects real GDP growth of some 1.5 percent in 2013, with risks slightly to the downside, should development spending be under-executed. Headline inflation rose to 9.3 percent in 2012. Executive Directors welcomed the signs of economic recovery, fueled by growth of the nonenergy sector.

Mr. Benedict J. Clements, Mr. David Coady, Ms. Stefania Fabrizio, Mr. Sanjeev Gupta, Mr. Trevor Serge Coleridge Alleyne, and Mr. Carlo A Sdralevich

Abstract

Energy subsidies are aimed at protecting consumers, however, subsidies aggravate fiscal imbalances, crowd out priority public spending, and depress private investment, including in the energy sector. This book provides the most comprehensive estimates of energy subsidies currently available for 176 countries and an analysis of “how to do” energy subsidy reform, drawing on insights from 22 country case studies undertaken by the IMF staff and analyses carried out by other institutions.

International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues Paper focuses on the Heritage and Stabilization Fund (HSF) and development in the energy sector in Trinidad and Tobago. The HSF, established in 2007, is an important national asset, which has broad-based political and social support. The HSF has developed a strong record since its creation. It has performed well as measured by the accumulation of savings, the portfolio return, and adherence to the Santiago Principles for transparency and governance. This is particularly commendable given global and domestic financial crises.
Mr. Paul Henri Mathieu and Clinton R. Shiells

This paper focuses on the Doha Development Agenda. The paper highlights that over the past 20 years, world trade has grown twice as fast as world real GDP, deepening economic integration and raising living standards. The paper underscores that the launch of a new trade round in Doha in November 2001 was a major breakthrough following the debacle in Seattle in 1999. The new round places the needs and interests of developing countries at the heart of its work, but a successful outcome for rich and poor nations alike is by no means a foregone conclusion.