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Mr. Jose M Cartas and Artak Harutyunyan

Abstract

This edition of Monetary and Financial Statistics Manual and Compilation Guide (Manual) updates and merges into one volume methodological and practical aspects of the compilation process of monetary statistics. The Manual is aimed at compilers and users of monetary data, offering guidance for the collection and analytical presentation of monetary statistics. The Manual includes standardized report forms, providing countries with a tool for compiling and reporting harmonized data for the central bank, other depository corporations, and other financial corporations.

International Monetary Fund
The paper examines the case for contingent financial instruments for low-income countries (LICs), from both the market and official sector. These include commodity price hedging instruments, contingent debt instruments (commodity-linked bonds, deferred repayment loans), and natural disaster insurance, for example. The paper considers the adequacy of the existing framework of ex post and ex ante support to LICs facing exogenous shocks, and examines the need for and possible constraints to greater availability of contingent instruments. Would there be a role for the international community, particularly the IMF and World Bank, in helping to address the constraints that limit development and use of these instruments?
International Monetary Fund
The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has successfully implemented key reforms under the enhanced Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative, despite experiencing exceptional challenges since the decision point, including a challenging security situation. Revised present value of HIPC assistance has given satisfactory assurances of their participation in the enhanced HIPC Initiative. The DRC does not qualify for topping-up under the enhanced HIPC Initiative. Full delivery of HIPC debt relief, and additional bilateral assistance beyond HIPC and Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative debt relief at the completion point would reduce the DRC’s external debt burden significantly.
Mr. Jeromin Zettelmeyer, Ms. Beatrice Weder, and Mr. Christoph A Klingen
We estimate ex post returns to emerging market debt by combining secondary-market prices with observed flows based on World Bank data. From 1970-2000, returns averaged 9 percent per annum, about the same as returns on a ten-year U.S. treasury bond. This reflects the combined effect of the 1980s debt crisis and much higher returns during 1989-2000. Annual returns since 1986 have been less volatile than emerging market equity returns but more volatile than returns on U.S. corporate or high-yield bonds. However, unlike returns on these bonds, emerging market debt returns do not seem significantly correlated with U.S. or world stock markets.
Mr. Philip R. Lane and Mr. Gian M Milesi-Ferretti
Recent years have witnessed a change in the composition of capital flows to developing countries, and FDI and equity flows have been playing an increasing role. In this paper we discuss the challenges for international macroeconomics that these developments pose and characterize stylized facts associated with the structure of external liabilities in developing countries, focusing in particular on FDI and equity stocks.