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  • Type: Journal Issue x
  • Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit: General x
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International Monetary Fund
The temporary increase in access limits under IMF emergency financing instruments will expire on October 5, 2020, unless extended. Access limits under emergency instruments (the Rapid Credit Facility (RCF) and Rapid Financing Instrument (RFI)) were increased in April 2020 for a period of six months, from 50 to 100 percent of quota annually and from 100 to 150 percent of quota cumulatively. The increased limits are subject to review and can be extended before their expiration. It is proposed to extend the period of higher access limits for emergency financing for a period of six months, through April 6, 2021. Against a background of continued pandemic-related disruption, staff expects there could be significant demand for emergency lending in the October 2020–April 2021 period, including from countries with pending requests and from countries that received emergency support at levels less than the maximum amounts available. A six-month extension would give more time for countries to benefit from higher access limits under emergency financing.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper assesses and disseminates experiences and lessons from low-income countries (LICs) in Sub-Saharan Africa that were selected by the Africa Department in 2015-16 as pilots for enhanced analysis of macro-financial linkages in Article IV staff reports. The paper focuses on the common characteristics across the pilot countries and highlights the tools used in the analysis, the challenges encountered, and the solutions deployed in overcoming them.
Dong Frank Wu
This paper focuses on the role of the pass-through of the exchange rate and policydeterminants in driving inflation. Using linear and nonlinear frameworks, the paper finds: (i) after the switch to a floating exchange rate regime in 2012, nonfood prices not only directly influence headline inflation, but also have an significant impact on food inflation via second round effects; (ii) the pass-through of the exchange rate to headline inflation has jumped from zero to 11 percent under the floating regime, after controlling for other factors; (iii) the improved significance of T-bill rates in shaping inflation flags its importance in Malawi’s monetary framework although the monetary transmission mechanism needs further strengthening; (iv) the increased impact of broad money underscores the necessity for fiscal discipline and central bank independence.
International Monetary Fund
This 2009 Article IV Consultation highlights that Malawi’s macroeconomic performance has improved significantly over the past two years, and the country’s agricultural-based economy has weathered the global economic storm relatively well. Good weather and the distribution of subsidized fertilizer have contributed to robust growth and moderate inflation in recent years. Malawi’s medium-term outlook is favorable, within the context of successful implementation of the Extended Credit Facility-supported program. Growth is expected to remain buoyant, but moderate somewhat relative to the high growth of the recent past.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses a request from Malawi for a one-year exogenous shocks facility (ESF) arrangement to help it adjust to the large terms-of-trade shock it has suffered. Real GDP growth of Malawi has been high and is expected to remain solid. Inflation, though rising in recent months, is still moderate and is expected to ease over the medium term. The government’s near-term program aims to increase the import coverage of official gross reserves while preserving growth and food security. IMF staff supports the authorities’ request for a one-year high-access ESF arrangement.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Sixth and Final Review for Malawi Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF). Performance remained generally strong in the period under review. The authorities met most program targets for end-December 2007, and domestic debt fell as a share of GDP, but the domestic borrowing performance criterion was missed. The government aims to meet the 2007/08 domestic borrowing target. Higher fuel and fertilizer prices are putting pressure on international reserves, which are down from an already inadequate level.
International Monetary Fund
This paper presents Malawi’s First Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility. The overvalued exchange rate has put external reserves under pressure, and the backlog of unpaid import invoices persists. The impact of the overvalued exchange rate on the value of donor inflows and the unforeseen upward revisions to debt obligations has increased domestic borrowing needs. The government is committed to program implementation, but faces intense political pressures because of its minority position in parliament.
International Monetary Fund
This paper explores how the Fund's instruments and practices might be adapted to support sound policies in low-income members, in particular those that do not have a need or want to use Fund resources.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.