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International Monetary Fund. Strategy, Policy, & Review Department, International Monetary Fund. Finance Dept., and International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept.
To help support members faced with the COVID-19 pandemic, the Fund temporarily increased certain access limits to its emergency financing (EF) instruments, i.e., Rapid Credit Facility (RCF) and Rapid Financing Instrument (RFI). While this expanded support has been critical to help countries manage the pandemic, the increase in access limits was not applied to the Large Natural Disasters (LND) windows within the EF toolkit, reducing the flexibility to respond to such LNDs. This paper proposes to temporarily increase by 50 percent of quota the annual access limit (AAL) and cumulative access limit (CAL) under the LND windows of the RCF and RFI. The changes to the “LND windows” would be in effect through end-December 2021, in line with the other temporary changes of access limits under EF instruments. The case for further extensions to all the temporarily increased EF AALs and CALs will be examined after the 2021 Annual Meetings.
International Monetary Fund
The FY 13–15 Medium-Term Budget presented in this paper reflects the following main features: Unchanged administrative budget in real terms for FY 13. Overall spending (structural plus crisis/temporary) will be kept unchanged in real terms in FY 13 relative to the FY 12 budget (excluding the one-off additional cost of the 2012 Annual Meetings in Tokyo).Broadly unchanged administrative envelope in nominal terms for FY 13. This reflects the impact of the Executive Board’s decision in March to grant no increase in the staff salary structure in the context of the 2012 Compensation Review. The “structure increase” is the main component in the budget deflator applied to map the real total envelope into nominal terms. A capital budget dominated by the impact of the HQ1 Renewal Program. The final appropriation for this project, approved by the Executive Board in March 2011, is reflected in the proposed capital budget for FY 13.
International Monetary Fund
In this study, economic performance remained robust throughout the global downturn, and shows signs of further strengthening. In 2010, the external position improved significantly, as fiscal surpluses raised official foreign assets, and the Highly Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) debt relief significantly reduced external liabilities. Macroeconomic stability is well established, and the external position has improved. Private sector development has reduced oil dependence and is assuring sustained poverty-reducing growth. Efforts should be supported by policies to increase the private sector’s access to credit, and deepen financial intermediation to improve the financial performance of state-owned enterprises.
International Monetary Fund
With the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) completion, Congo’s prospects for achieving sustained growth and poverty reduction have improved. The HIPC completion reduced debt service obligations and increased the resilience of external debt indicators to shocks. Non-oil revenue is improved through broadening the tax base and improving the design of the tax system. The objectives of the poverty reduction strategy (PRS) and fiscal sustainability would require lasting gains in non-oil revenue collection. IMF staff welcomes the authority’s good faith efforts to obtain comparable treatment from all remaining commercial creditors.
International Monetary Fund
This supplement provides clarifications and proposes revision to the reforms of the nonconcessional lending toolkit contained in the staff papers on “The Fund’s Mandate—Future Financing Role: Reform Proposals”. The focus of this supplement is on the Flexible Credit Line (FCL) and the Precautionary Credit Line (PCL), for which revised proposed decisions are attached.
International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses key findings of the Second Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF) for the Republic of Congo. Policy implementation through the first half of 2009 was satisfactory. All quantitative performance criteria and all but one of the structural benchmarks were met. The non-oil basic primary deficit target for end-June was observed by a comfortable margin. Progress toward observing the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) floating completion point triggers has accelerated recently, and the authorities are making a strong effort to reach the completion point by year-end.
International Monetary Fund
This paper focuses on the First Review for the Republic of Congo under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF). Policy implementation under the authorities’ PRGF arrangement through 2008 and the early part of 2009 was broadly satisfactory. The quantitative target on the non-oil primary fiscal balance was observed, but the authorities contracted new nonconcessional external debt. The authorities have also made progress in implementing many of the floating completion point triggers under the enhanced Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Initiative.
International Monetary Fund
Social and political stability has improved in Congo, but the security situation is fragile. Executive Directors welcomed the Staff-Monitored Program (SMP), which was designed to safeguard fiscal and external stability. They stressed the need for stabilizing the economy and pursuing structural reforms with a view for achieving sustainable growth, reducing poverty, diversifying the economy, and benefiting from enhanced HIPC Initiative debt relief. As a sign of their renewed commitment to reengagement with the IMF, authorities established a new organizational structure for better monitoring and implementation of the economic and financial program.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews the 2006 Staff-Monitored Program (SMP) and a New Staff-Monitored Program for 2007 for the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Most quantitative and structural benchmarks under the SMP for April–December 2006 were not met; nevertheless, the SMP helped prevent major financial instability during the protracted electoral period. Cognizant of the need to reestablish macroeconomic stability, the government agreed on a policy framework for 2007 to be monitored by the IMF staff. Satisfactory performance under the SMP would open the way for discussions on a new arrangement under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility.