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International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
Economic growth slowed down, but became more broad-based. In 2017, real GDP growth was 2.1 percent, with the non-mining GDP rebounding from its contraction in 2016. The external balance turned negative due to weaker than expected export growth and higher oil prices. Inflation remains relatively low, and the monetary stance accommodative. Oil production is expected to commence in 2020, and additional oil discoveries have significantly improved the medium- and long-term outlook.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This 2017 Article IV Consultation highlights the expansion of Guyana’s real economic activity by 3.3 percent in 2016. Subdued agricultural commodity prices, bad weather, and delays in public investment weighed down activity, while large increases in gold output helped support growth. Consumer prices increased by 1.5 percent in the 12 months ending in December 2016 as weather-related shocks to food prices reversed the deflationary trend. The macroeconomic outlook is positive for 2017 and the medium term. Growth is projected at 3.5 percent in 2017, supported by an increase in public investment, continued expansion in the extractive sector, and a recovery in rice production.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper discusses recent economic developments, the outlook, and risks for the Czech Republic. The economy has been growing at an exceptionally strong pace. Driven by robust domestic demand, output expanded by 4.2 percent—the highest rate in the central and eastern European region—in 2015. Labor market performance has been strong. Fiscal performance was better than budgeted in 2015. The banking sector is stable, and credit growth continues to strengthen. However, economic activity is expected to slow in 2016. Private consumption will remain robust on the heels of higher disposable income and employment, but the projected slowdown in EU-fund absorption will weigh on growth.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
The economy has experienced seven consecutive years of robust growth, buoyed by high commodity prices, foreign direct investment and expansion of private sector credit. As part of a strategy to sustain growth, reduce poverty and curtail dependence on imported oil, the authorities are pursuing the Amaila Falls Hydro-electric Project (AFHP), entailing investment of about 30 percent of GDP. However, steps by Parliament that delayed important approvals led the private sector partner to withdraw, which could delay the project while additional financing is sought. Meanwhile, public debt remains high—around 60 percent of GDP—limiting the room to finance inclusive growth.
International Monetary Fund
Despite external and domestic shocks, the Guyanese economy demonstrated resilience and registered a fifth consecutive year of robust growth in 2010. The authorities started making payouts to Colonial Life Insurance Company (CLICO) policyholders, in line with their plans to minimize fiscal costs. Efforts to improve the Guyana Revenue Authority (GRA) continued. Its new functional organization was consolidated, improving further the integrated tax information system (TRIPS), the profiling of taxpayers, and on-site inspections at the country’s ports of entry. Executive Directors endorsed the authorities’ Low Carbon Development Strategy.
International Monetary Fund
Guyana has weathered the impact of the global crisis well by regional and global standards. The current account deficit declined by 5 percent of GDP (to 8.5 percent of GDP), largely led by a reduction in imports, particularly of fuel. Macroeconomic policies have remained prudent. Monetary policy tightened somewhat in 2009, supporting the decline in inflation and external stability. Structural reform has continued to focus on further reducing vulnerabilities and entrenching long-term growth. The authorities have consolidated insurance and bank supervision at the central bank.
International Monetary Fund
Guyana continues to make progress in laying the foundation for poverty reduction, but at a slow pace. Critical issues remain to be addressed. Establishing an environment for sustained growth remains the main challenge for the government. It will be important to maintain the reform momentum and ensure basic security. An effective monitoring and evaluation framework needs to be fully implemented to support poverty reduction efforts. Prudent fiscal policies and a prioritized public sector investment program should continue to be pursued to improve debt sustainability prospects.
International Monetary Fund
The mid-term review was undertaken to help funding and implementing agencies foster a greater level of understanding of the Caribbean Regional Technical Assistance Center's (CARTAC) work. It ascertains activities to date and should help the Steering Committee determine optimal strategies for the Center’s continuation.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Tanzanian President Benjamin William Mkapa’s remarks on the inauguration of East AFRITAC could not have been clearer or more emphatic. If Africa is to define its own economic destiny, it must strengthen its ability to design and implement sound economic policies. And policy ownership and capacity building are what the new regional technical assistance center, which opened October 24 in Dar es Salaam, is all about.