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International Monetary Fund. Office of Budget and Planning
Amidst the unfolding COVID-19 crisis, the Fund faces twin challenges. Signs of early crisis recovery are uneven across countries, and many face daunting crisis legacies. At the same time, longer term challenges from climate change, digitalization and increasing divergence within and between countries demand stepped up effort by the Fund within its areas of expertise and in partnership with others. FY 22-24 budget framework. Considering these challenges and following a decade of flat real budgets, staff will propose a structural augmentation for consideration by fall 2021 to be implemented over two to three years beginning in FY 23. Recognizing the importance of ongoing fiscal prudence, the budget would remain stable thereafter on a real basis at a new, higher level. FY 22 administrative budget. The proposed FY 22 budget sustains crisis response and provides incremental resources for long-term priorities within the flat real budget envelope. The budget is built on extensive reprioritization; savings, including from modernization; and a proposed temporary increase in the carry forward ceiling to address crisis needs during the FY 22 to FY 24 period. Capital budget. Large-scale business modernization programs continue to be rolled out, strengthening the agility and efficiency of the Fund’s operations. In response to the shift towards cloud-based IT solutions, staff propose a change in the budgetary treatment of these expenses. Investment in facilities will focus on timely updates, repairs, and modernization, preparing for the post-crisis Fund where virtual engagement and a new hybrid office environment play a larger role. Budget sustainability. The FY 22–24 medium-term budget framework, including assumptions for a material augmentation, is consistent with a projected surplus in the Fund’s medium-term income position and with continued progress towards the precautionary balance target for coming years. Budget risks. In the midst of a global crisis, risks to the budget remain elevated and above risk acceptance levels, including from uncertainty around the level of demand for Fund programs and ensuing staffing needs, as well as future donor funding for CD. Enterprise risk management continues to be strengthened with this budget.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
The Cabo Verdean economy is in recession as a result of the economic impact of the pandemic that has shut down the tourism and transport sectors and significantly affected the rest of the economy. The number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise with concentration in the largest island, though the recovery rate is high. The economic outlook remains highly uncertain and dependent upon the duration of the pandemic, the global economic recovery, and the authorities’ ability to support the expected economic recovery through the appropriate policies and reforms. Legislative and presidential elections are scheduled for April and October, respectively.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
The Cabo Verdean economy is facing considerable challenges stemming from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Prior to the health crisis, economic growth was robust, the fiscal and external positions were improving, reserves were at comfortable levels, and public debt was on a downward trajectory. The pandemic is threatening to erode these gains and has generated significant financing needs. The authorities have been implementing policy and healthcare measures to address the fallout of the pandemic and protect vulnerable groups while seeking to safeguard macroeconomic stability.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.

Request for Disbursement Under the Rapid Credit Facility-Press Release; Staff Report; and Statement by the Executive Director for Cabo Verde

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper highlights Cabo Verde’s First Review Under the Policy Coordination Instrument (PCI) and Request for Modification of Targets. Performance under the PCI-supported program has been strong. All reform targets were met, with some measures put in place ahead of schedule; and all end-September 2019 quantitative targets were met, except for the floor on tax revenue, missed by a narrow margin due to lower-than-projected taxes on international trade. Economic prospects for 2020 are clouded by the expected impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), resulting from the global economic downturn and travel restrictions which adversely affect tourism flows, foreign direct investment and remittances. Coordinated support from Cabo Verde’s development partners will be needed to support the authorities’ efforts in addressing the economic and social impact of COVID-19. The medium-term outlook remains positive although risks are tilted to the downside. Growth is expected to rebound in 2021 and return to the pre-COVID-19 medium-term trajectory of about 5 percent as the global economy recovers, and the authorities maintain their structural reform efforts to improve the business environment and build the economy’s resilience to adverse shocks.