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International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews recent developments in the status of financing for the Fund’s concessional lending and debt relief. It presents the latest data available and projections whilst taking into account the pledges made thus far in response to the Managing Director’s fund-raising requests of August 2009 and February and November 2012. Additionally, following the Executive Board’s decision in September 2012, the PRGT’s self-sustained capacity is discussed in the context of longer-term projections of the demand for concessional lending. Section II provides an overview of the Fund’s concessional lending instruments and the associated financing framework as well as the developments since the October 2012 Update. Section III reviews the sources of financing for PRGT operations and discusses developments in the PRGT framework. Section IV reviews the use of PRGT resources and assesses the Trust’s self-sustained capacity in light of the demand projections. Section V provides updates on the subsidization of emergency assistance, while Section VI presents the developments on the financing of debt relief under the HIPC, MDRI, and PCDR Trust. The paper concludes with a proposed decision completing the financing reviews of the PRG-HIPC and MDRI Trusts.
International Monetary Fund
This paper proposes the distribution of a portion of the Fund’s general reserve that is attributed to profits from recent Fund gold sales. The proposed distribution is part of a strategy endorsed by the Board in July 2009 involving the use of resources linked to gold sale profits to facilitate members’ contributions towards Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust (PRGT) subsidies. The strategy was formulated in the context of a comprehensive reform of the Fund’s Low Income Country (LIC) facilities and concessional financing framework approved by the Executive Board that included a financing package aimed at ensuring the PRGT’s capacity to lend concessional resources of up to SDR 11.3 billion ($17 billion) during the period 2009–14. The financing package included an agreement to raise SDR 1.5 billion in subsidy resources, of which SDR 0.5–0.6 billion (in end-2008 NPV terms) was expected to be generated from resources linked to profits from gold sales.
International Monetary Fund
In April 2011, Executive Directors held a preliminary discussion on the use of the profits of SDR 6.85 billion from the Fund’s limited gold sale. They noted their expectation that at least SDR 4.4 billion of the profits would be placed in an endowment within the Investment Account, and affirmed their support for the 2009 financing package for low-income countries (LICs), including the distribution to the Fund’s membership of up to SDR 0.7 billion from the profits linked to gold sales, with the expectation that most members will return equivalent funds to the Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust (PRGT). There was a wide range of views among Directors on the three main options presented for the windfall of SDR 1.75 billion, but no consensus favoring a single option. The main options presented included use of resources linked to the windfall to boost the capacity of the PRGT, counting the windfall towards precautionary balances, or investing the windfall profits as part of the Investment Account’s endowment. Many Directors indicated that they could support a combination of two or more of the main options.
International Monetary Fund
In December 2010, the Fund concluded the limited gold sale (403 metric tons) approved by the Board in September 2009. The main purpose of the sale was to generate profits to fund an endowment that would diversify the Fund’s income sources away from lending income. In addition, the Board agreed in July 2009, before approving the sale, to a strategy pursuant to which resources linked to the gold sale would contribute to boosting the Fund’s concessional lending capacity. Total profits from the gold sale were SDR 6.85 billion. The profits significantly exceeded those assumed in April 2008 when agreement was reached on the key features of the new income model, and in July 2009 at the time of the discussions on a financing package to support reform of the Fund’s concessional lending activities. This reflects the substantial increase in the market price of gold throughout the period of the gold sales. With the gold sale complete, it is timely for the Board to revisit the issues relating to the use of the profits. This paper seeks to provide a basis for initial Board consideration of this topic. It focuses primarily on the options for use of the windfall profits above a price of US$935 per ounce, which was the average price required to generate resources for the endowment at the assumed gold price underlying the new income model and to implement the agreed strategy to provide SDR 0.5–0.6 billion in resources linked to gold sales as part of the 2009 concessional financing package.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews the Fund’s income position for FY 2009 and FY 2010. The proposals build on previous discussions relating to implementation of the new income model, the framework for accumulating precautionary balances, and the recent reform of the Fund’s lending toolkit. The paper is structured as follows: Section II reviews the income position for FY 2009 and explains the main changes from the projections at the midyear review; Section III makes proposals that pertain to the FY 2009 income position, including the disposition of investment income, the overall income position of the General Resources Account (GRA), and the annual reimbursement of the GRA for the expenses of conducting the business of the SDR Department and the MDRI-I Trust; Section IV reviews the FY 2010 income outlook, including the margin for the rate of charge; Section V reviews the burden sharing mechanism; and Section VI reviews special charges.
International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.
This paper outlines the extent of the IMF with its present policies and practices or with some modification of those policies and practices that is capable of dealing satisfactorily with certain problems of international liquidity. Liquidity that is conditional in any of these senses may be somewhat less prized by the country possessing it than would be an equivalent amount of unconditional liquidity; but the imposition of such conditions may be for the general advantage of the international community, and may make countries having surpluses in their balances of payments readier to provide, or to facilitate the provision of, additional liquidity. An increased supply of the type of liquidity of which the use is subject to policy conditions will have somewhat different results. Although it will probably increase the amount and the financing of external deficits, even this is not certain. The various types of liquidity are to some extent substitutes for each other.
International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

The speeches made by officials attending the IMF–World Bank Annual Meetings are published in this volume, along with the press communiqués issued by the International Monetary and Financial Committee and the Development Committee at the conclusion of the meetings.

International Monetary Fund. Secretary's Department

Abstract

The speeches made by officials attending the IMF–World Bank Annual Meetings are published in this volume, along with the press communiqués issued by the International Monetary and Financial Committee and the Development Committee at the conclusion of the meetings.