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International Monetary Fund. Strategy, Policy, & and Review Department
"The first data and statistics strategy for the Fund comes at a critical time. A fast-changing data landscape, new data needs for evolving surveillance priorities, and persisting data weaknesses across the membership pose challenges and opportunities for the Fund and its members. The challenges emerging from the digital revolution include an unprecedented amount of new data and measurement questions on growth, productivity, inflation, and welfare. Newly available granular and high-frequency (big) data offer the potential for more timely detection of vulnerabilities. In the wake of the crisis, Fund surveillance requires greater cross-country data comparability; staff and authorities face the complexity of integrating new data sources and closing data gaps, while working to address the weaknesses noted by the IEO Report (Behind the Scenes with Data at the IMF) in 2016. The overarching strategy is to move toward an ecosystem of data and statistics that enables the Fund and its members to better meet the evolving data needs in a digital world. It integrates Fund-wide work streams on data provision to the Fund for surveillance purposes, international statistical standards, capacity development, and data management under a common institutional objective. It seeks seamless access and sharing of data within the Fund, enabling cloud-based data dissemination to support data provision by member countries (e.g., the “global data commons”), closing data gaps with new sources including Big Data, and improving assessments of data adequacy for surveillance to help better prioritize capacity development. The Fund also will work with policymakers to understand the implications of the digital economy and digital data for the macroeconomic statistics, including new measures of welfare beyond GDP."
International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) launched the data standards initiatives to enhance member countries’ data transparency and to promote their development of sound statistical systems. The need for data standards was highlighted by the financial crises of the mid-1990s, in which information deficiencies were seen to play a role. Under the data standards initiatives, the IMF established the Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS) in 1996 to provide guidance to countries that have or seek access to capital markets to disseminate key data so that users in general, and financial market participants in particular, have adequate information to assess the economic situations of individual countries. The SDDS not only prescribes that subscribers disseminate certain data categories, but also prescribes that subscribers disseminate the relevant metadata to promote public knowledge and understanding of their compilation practices with respect to the required data categories. In 1997, the IMF introduced under the initiatives the General Data Dissemination System (GDDS) to provide a framework for countries that aim to develop their statistical systems, within which they can work toward disseminating comprehensive and reliable data and, eventually, meet SDDS requirements. At the Eighth Review of the Fund’s Data Standards Initiatives in February 2012, the IMF’s Executive Board approved the SDDS Plus as an upper tier of the Fund’s data standards initiatives. The SDDS Plus is open to all SDDS subscribers and is aimed at economies with systemically important financial sectors.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS) was established by the IMF in 1996 to guide members that already had, or that might seek, access to international capital markets in providing key economic and financial data to the public. In the following year, the IMF established the General Data Dissemination Standard (GDDS), which seeks to prepare countries for meeting the requirements of the SDDS. Data supplied by countries subscribing to the SDDS, as well as information provided by countries participating in the GDDS, are posted on the Dissemination Standards Bulletin Board (DSBB) on the IMF's public website (http://dsbb.imf.org). This Guide is intended to assist subscribers of the SDDS, GDDS participants moving toward subscription to the SDDS, and users of the DSBB in becoming aware of the features and scope of the SDDS and the DSBB. It is intended to further the IMF's initiatives in data transparency and standards, to enhance the public availability of timely and comprehensive international statistics, and therefore to contribute to countries pursuit of sound macroeconomic policies and to the improved functioning of global financial markets.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

Las Normas Especiales para la Divulgación de Datos (NEDD) fueron establecidas por el FMI en 1996 con el objeto de orientar a los países que ya tienen acceso o procuran obtener acceso a los mercados internacionales de capital en la tarea de divulgar datos económicos y financieros al público. Al año siguiente, el FMI estableció las Normas Generales para la Divulgación de Datos (NGDD), con el objeto de preparar a los países para que puedan cumplir con los requisitos de las NEDD. Los datos suministrados por los países suscriptos a las NEDD, así como la información proporcionada por los países participantes en las NGDD, se publican en la Cartelera Electrónica de Divulgación de Datos (CEDD) en la página web pública del FMI (http://dsbb.imf.org). Esta Guía busca ayudar los suscriptores de las NEDD, a los participantes en el SGDD en transición hacia las NEDD, y a los usuarios de la CEDD a familiarizarse con las características y el alcance de las NEDD y de la CEDD. Su objetivo es promover las iniciativas del FMI en materia de transparencia y normas de datos, mejorar la disponibilidad pública de estadísticas internacionales oportunas y completas, y de esa manera contribuir a la aplicación de políticas macroeconómicas sólidas en los países y a un mejor funcionamiento de los mercados financieros mundiales.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

La norme spéciale de diffusion des données (NSDD) a été créée en 1996 par le FMI pour aider les pays membres – qui ont ou pourraient chercher à avoir accès aux marchés internationaux de capitaux – à communiquer des données économiques et financières importantes au public. L'année suivante, le FMI a créé la norme générale de diffusion des données (NGDD), qui vise à préparer les pays à satisfaire aux exigences de la NSDD. Les données fournies par les pays souscrivant à la NSDD, ainsi que les informations fournies par les pays participant la NGDD, sont publiées sur le tableau d’affichage des normes de diffusion (TAND) du FMI (site web : http://dsbb.imf.org). Ce guide a pour objectif d'aider les souscripteurs à la NSDD, les pays participant à la NGDD qui s'apprêtent à souscrire à la NSDD, et les utilisateurs du TAND à se familiariser avec les caractéristiques et le champ d'application de la NSDD et du TAND. Il vise à compléter les initiatives du FMI en matière de transparence et de normes relatives aux données, à améliorer la publication de statistiques internationales complètes et à jour, et de contribuer ainsi aux efforts entrepris par les pays pour adopter des politiques macroéconomique saines, ainsi qu'à l'amélioration du fonctionnement des marchés financiers mondiaux.

Mr. William E. Alexander, Mr. John Cady, and Mr. Jesus R Gonzalez-Garcia

Abstract

The Data Dissemination Initiative was launched in the mid-1990s as part of a broader internationally-agreed-upon initiative to strengthen transparency and promote good governance practices by establishing standards and codes. Ten years later, the initiative is viewed as an integral part of the international financial architecture, and is considered to have improved the functioning of international financial markets and contributed to global financial stability. This volume reviews certain aspects of the development of and experience with the initiative over the past decade, and concludes by reflecting on potential challenges ahead and possible enhancements.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS) was established by the IMF in 1996 to guide members that already had, or that might seek, access to international capital markets in providing key economic and financial data to the public. In the following year, the IMF established the General Data Dissemination Standard (GDDS), which seeks to prepare countries for meeting the requirements of the SDDS. Data supplied by countries subscribing to the SDDS, as well as information provided by countries participating in the GDDS, are posted on the Dissemination Standards Bulletin Board (DSBB) on the IMF's public website (http://dsbb.imf.org). This Guide is intended to assist subscribers of the SDDS, GDDS participants moving toward subscription to the SDDS, and users of the DSBB in becoming aware of the features and scope of the SDDS and the DSBB. It is intended to further the IMF's initiatives in data transparency and standards, to enhance the public availability of timely and comprehensive international statistics, and therefore to contribute to countries pursuit of sound macroeconomic policies and to the improved functioning of global financial markets.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS) was established by the IMF in 1996 to guide members that already had, or that might seek, access to international capital markets in providing key economic and financial data to the public. In the following year, the IMF established the General Data Dissemination Standard (GDDS), which seeks to prepare countries for meeting the requirements of the SDDS. Data supplied by countries subscribing to the SDDS, as well as information provided by countries participating in the GDDS, are posted on the Dissemination Standards Bulletin Board (DSBB) on the IMF's public website (http://dsbb.imf.org). This Guide is intended to assist subscribers of the SDDS, GDDS participants moving toward subscription to the SDDS, and users of the DSBB in becoming aware of the features and scope of the SDDS and the DSBB. It is intended to further the IMF's initiatives in data transparency and standards, to enhance the public availability of timely and comprehensive international statistics, and therefore to contribute to countries pursuit of sound macroeconomic policies and to the improved functioning of global financial markets.

International Monetary Fund
This Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes Data Module provides a review of Canada’s data dissemination practices against the IMF’s special data dissemination standard (SDDS), complemented by the in-depth assessment of the quality of six key sets of macroeconomic statistics: national accounts, consumer price index, producer price index, government finance statistics, balance of payments, and monetary statistics. Canada’s macroeconomic statistics are of high quality. They are comprehensive, timely, and accurate, and thus are adequate to conduct effective surveillance of economic and financial policies.
Mr. Sarmad Khawaja and Mr. Thomas K. Morrison
The paper outlines a general framework for statistical legislation. The implications of statistical legislation for the whole statistical system, as well as for centralized versus decentralized statistical systems, are addressed. The general framework is spelled out by identifying "essential" components of statistical legislation. The paper illustrates how these components can be applied to different country situations, and it draws attention to a number of additional topics for discussion and areas for future study in statistical legislation. It also brings together summary descriptions of the statistical legislation of a large number of countries that underlie the derivation of the essential components. It thus provides a reference for countries considering new or revised statistical legislation.