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  • Solomon Islands x
  • National Budget, Deficit, and Debt: General x
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Ezequiel Cabezon, Ms. Patrizia Tumbarello, and Mr. Yiqun Wu
Reflecting diseconomies of scale in providing public goods and services, recurrent spending in small states typically represents a large share of GDP. For some small states, this limits the fiscal space available for growth-promoting capital spending. Small states generally face greater revenue volatility than other country groups, owing to their exposure to exogenous shocks (including natural disasters) and narrow production bases. With limited buffers, revenue volatility often results in procyclical fiscal policy as the econometric analysis shows. To strengthen fiscal frameworks, small states should seek to streamline and prioritize recurrent spending to create fiscal space for capital spending. The quality of spending could also be improved through public financial management reform and multiyear budgeting.
International Monetary Fund

Generally, macroeconomic performance has been as envisaged at the time of the program request. The near-term outlook has improved, despite uncertain global conditions. The new government of Solomon Islands remains committed to program targets and objectives agreed. The government’s efforts in adhering to program fiscal targets are commendable, as the main anchor to macroeconomic stability. Excess liquidity in the banking system and commodity price pressures continue to pose inflation risks. Strong adherence to the program would help anchor macroeconomic policy and address structural weaknesses.

International Monetary Fund

Generally, macroeconomic performance has been as envisaged at the time of the program request. The near-term outlook has improved, despite uncertain global conditions. The new government of Solomon Islands remains committed to program targets and objectives agreed. The government’s efforts in adhering to program fiscal targets are commendable, as the main anchor to macroeconomic stability. Excess liquidity in the banking system and commodity price pressures continue to pose inflation risks. Strong adherence to the program would help anchor macroeconomic policy and address structural weaknesses.

Ms. Gabriela Inchauste, Mr. Bernardin Akitoby, Mr. Benedict J. Clements, and Mr. Sanjeev Gupta
We examine the short- and long-term movements of government spending relative to output in 51 countries. We find that in the short term, the main components of government spending increase with output in about half of the sample countries, with some variation across spending categories and countries. Further, we find that there is a long-term relationship between government spending and output (in line with "Wagner's law") for the majority of countries for at least one spending aggregate. In the short term, we find that power dispersion and government size typically dampen the positive response of government spending to output. Output volatility and financial risk, on the other hand, contribute to the procylicality of government spending.