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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The current report finds that short-term risks to global financial stability have abated since April 2016, but that medium-term risks continue to build. Financial institutions in advanced economies face a number of cyclical and structural challenges and need to adapt to low growth and low interest rates, as well as to an evolving market and regulatory environment. Weak profitability could erode banks’ buffers over time and undermine their ability to support growth. A cyclical recovery will not resolve the problem of low profitability. More deep-rooted reforms and systemic management are needed, especially for European banks. The solvency of many life insurance companies and pension funds is threatened by a prolonged period of low interest rates. Corporate leverage in emerging market economies remains elevated in some countries, but the current favorable external environment presents an opportunity for overly indebted firms to restructure their balance sheets. The political climate is unsettled in many countries. A lack of income growth and a rise in inequality have opened the door for populist, inward-looking policies. These factors make it even harder to tackle legacy problems and further expose economies and markets to shocks. A potent and more balanced policy mix is needed to deliver a stronger path for growth and financial stability, and avoid slipping into a state of financial and economic stagnation. The report also examines how the rise of nonbank financing has altered the impact of monetary policy and finds that fears of a decline in the effectiveness of monetary policy are unfounded. It appears that the transmission of monetary policy is, if anything, stronger in economies with larger nonbank financial sectors. Finally, the report examines the link between corporate governance, investor protection, and financial stability in emerging market economies. It finds that the improvements over the past two decades have helped bolster the resilience of their financial systems. These benefits strengthen the case for further reform.

International Monetary Fund

Abstract

The April 2014 Global Financial Stability Report finds that, despite much progress, the global financial system remains in a transitional period with stability conditions far from normal. Advanced and emerging market economies alike need to make a successful shift from liquidity- to growth-driven markets, which will require a number of elements, including a normalization of U.S. monetary policy; financial rebalancing in emerging markets; further progress in the euro area integration; and continued implementation of “Abenomics” in Japan. This report also examines how changes in the investor base and financial deepening affect emerging market economies as well as looks at the issue of banks considered too important to fail, providing new estimates of the implicit funding subsidy these banks receive.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The October 2013 Global Financial Stability Report examines current risks facing the global financial system at it undergoes a series of transitions along the path toward greater financial stability. The United States may soon move to less accommodative monetary policies and higher long-term interest rates as its recovery gains ground. Emerging markets face a transition to more volatile external conditions and higher risk premiums. Japan is moving toward the new “Abenomics” policy regime, and the euro area is moving toward a more robust and safer financial sector. Finally, the global banking system is phasing in stronger regulatory standards. Chapter 1 examines the challenges and risks of each of these transitions. Chapter 2 looks at efforts by policymakers to revive weak credit growth, which has been seen by many as a primary reason behind the slow economic recovery. The chapter argues that policies are most effective if they target the constraints that underlie the weakness in credit. But it cautions policymakers to be aware of the fiscal costs and implications for financial stability of credit-supporting policies. Chapter 3 examines how banking funding structures matter for financial stability and the potential impact of various regulatory reforms. It concludes that careful implementation of reform efforts are important to ensure that financial stability benefits are realized.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report examines current risks facing the global financial system and policy actions that may mitigate these. It analyzes the key challenges facing financial and nonfinancial firms as they continue to repair their balance sheets. Chapter 2 takes a closer look at whether sovereign credit default swaps markets are good indicators of sovereign credit risk. Chapter 3 examines unconventional monetary policy in some depth, including the policies pursued by the Federal Reserve, the Bank of England, the Bank of Japan, the European Central Bank, and the U.S. Federal Reserve.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The October 2009 Global Financial Stability Report chronicles the evolution of the path toward reestablishing sound credit intermediation and the near-term risks that could interrupt its restoration, including the rising burden of sovereign financing. The report addresses how to restart securitization markets and the pitfalls if done improperly. The effectiveness of unconventional public sector interventions and the principles for disengagement are discussed. The report also discusses the design of medium-term policies that aim to reshape the financial system to make it more resilient and stable.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report identifies potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crisis, while providing comprehensive coverage of mature and emerging financial markets. The GFSR focuses on current conditions in global financial markets, highlighting issues that could pose risks to financial market stability and market access by emerging market borrowers. The October 2008 GFSR reflects information available up to September 15, 2008.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This semi-annual publication from the IMF provides comprehensive coverage of mature and emerging financial markets and seeks to identify potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crises. It is designed to deepen understanding of global capital flows, which play a critical role as an engine of world economic growth.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This paper analyzes developments in the hedge fund industry. The significant growth of hedge funds, driven by institutional investors, has heightened the desire by the official sector to better understand hedge funds and their activities. The paper examines how one may achieve a better understanding of hedge funds and their market activities, particularly for financial stability considerations. The paper reviews and updates developments in the hedge-fund industry since the previous IMF study in 1998, and considers what progress has been made to satisfy various recommendations and proposals from that time.