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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

Near-term global financial stability risks have been contained as an unprecedented policy response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has helped avert a financial meltdown and maintain the flow of credit to the economy. For the first time, many emerging market central banks have launched asset purchase programs to support the smooth functioning of financial markets and the overall economy. But the outlook remains highly uncertain, and vulnerabilities are rising, representing potential headwinds to recovery. The report presents an assessment of the real-financial disconnect, as well as forward-looking analysis of nonfinancial firms, banks, and emerging market capital flows. After the outbreak, firms’ cash flows were adversely affected as economic activity declined sharply. More vulnerable firms—those with weaker solvency and liquidity positions and smaller size—experienced greater financial stress than their peers in the early stages of the crisis. As the crisis unfolds, corporate liquidity pressures may morph into insolvencies, especially if the recovery is delayed. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are more vulnerable than large firms with access to capital markets. Although the global banking system is well capitalized, some banking systems may experience capital shortfalls in an adverse scenario, even with the currently deployed policy measures. The report also assesses the pandemic’s impact on firms’ environmental performance to gauge the extent to which the crisis may result in a reversal of the gains posted in recent years.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This September 2005 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that financial conditions have remained broadly positive over the past six months, but some market developments diverged from consensus expectations of market participants. Long-term interest rates, instead of rising, as expected by some investors, have moderated, leading to a further flattening of global yield curves. This reflected cyclical factors, as market participants seemed to expect more moderate global growth and inflation, and structural factors such as a secular portfolio shift toward long-term bonds by pension funds and life insurance companies.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

This September 2002 issue of the Global Financial Stability Report highlights that during the second quarter of 2002, a sharp erosion of investor confidence heightened risk aversion and growing concerns about the strength and durability of the global recovery. The pace and quality of corporate earnings had repercussions in all of the major equity, credit, and foreign exchange markets. Market adjustments occurred against the background of the bursting of the telecom, media, and technology bubble, which exposed a culture of irrational exuberance, and sometimes greed, among many buyers, sellers, and intermediaries.