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Mr. Carlos Sanchez-Munoz, Mr. Paul A Austin, Alicia Hierro, and Ms. Tamara Razin

Abstract

The 2019 Annual Report of the IMF Committee on Balance of Payments Statistics (the Committee) provides an overview of recent trends in global balance of payments and international investment position statistics, summarizes the Committee’s work during 2019, and presents the work program of the Committee in the coming year.

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

This January 2019 monthly issue of International Financial Statistics (IFS) contains country tables for most IMF members, as well as for Anguilla, Aruba, the Central African Economic and Monetary Community, Curaçao, the currency union of Curaçao and Sint Maarten, the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union, the euro area, Montserrat, the former Netherlands Antilles, Sint Maarten, the West African Economic Monetary Union, West Bank and Gaza, and some non-sovereign territorial entities for which statistics are provided internationally on a separate basis. Exchange rates in IFS are classified into three broad categories, reflecting the role of the authorities in determining the rates and/or the multiplicity of the exchange rates in a country. The three categories are the market rate, describing an exchange rate determined largely by market forces; the official rate, describing an exchange rate determined by the authorities—sometimes in a flexible manner; and the principal, secondary, or tertiary rate, for countries maintaining multiple exchange arrangements.

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

International Financial Statistics, Database & Browser, December 2018

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

Direction of Trade Statistics, December 2018

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

This paper analyzes In the World and Regional Tables, missing data are estimated for countries by IMF staff to the extent possible. The estimation procedure is based largely on the use of the World Economic Outlook (WEO) database in BPM6 format. The BPM6-based WEO provides expanded data coverage for some series and facilitates an improved basis for estimation procedures used in BOPSY. However, data published in BOPSY may differ from balance-of-payments data published in the WEO mainly due to timing and estimation methodology differences. The following outlines the methodology used to gap-fill balance-of-payments data where country data are missing. For goods and services transactions, where data gaps exist in years prior to estimates are made by applying the growth rates derived from the WEO for the missing year(s) to the latest reported annual data (debits and credits). In cases where there are gaps for the entire period, WEO data are inserted directly.

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

This November 2018 issue of International Financial Statistics (IFS) is a standard source of statistics on all aspects of international and domestic finance. IFS, Balance of Payments Statistics, Direction of Trade Statistics, and Government Finance Statistics are available on CD-ROM by annual subscription. The CD-ROMs incorporate a Windows-based browser facility, as well as a flat file of the database in scientific notation. The country tables normally include data on a country’s exchange rates, IMF position, international liquidity, monetary statistics, interest rates, prices, production, labor, international transactions, government accounts, national accounts, and population. Selected series, including data on IMF accounts, international reserves, and international trade, are drawn from the country tables and published in world tables as well. The monthly printed issue of IFS reports current monthly, quarterly, and annual data, while the yearbook reports 12 observations of annual data. In IFS, exchange rates are expressed in time series of national currency units per SDR and national currency units per US dollar, or vice versa.

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

This paper discusses that shipments to and from free-trade zones and bonded warehouses, exclusion of military and other confidential items and government goods, value thresholds for customs registration of shipments, returned goods, and other goods missed by customs (or surveys) are examples of coverage differences that can result in inconsistencies. As a result of reporting and processing lags, trade data for a given period are often released before all customs documents for the period have been processed. These data are sometimes not revised, or, if data are revised, errors are nevertheless made in assigning the date on which goods are shipped or received and the late data are assigned to the wrong month, quarter, and/or year. Errors can also be made in assigning a destination to exports and an origin to imports during customs clearances, or in cases when the ultimate destination is changed after the initial consignment during transshipment, the change is not incorporated into published statistics via the release of revised data.

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

International Financial Statistics, Database & Browser, October 2018

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

Direction of Trade Statistics, September 2018

International Monetary Fund. Statistics Dept.

Abstract

This monthly issue of International Financial Statistics (IFS) contains country tables for most IMF members, as well as for Anguilla, Aruba, the Central African Economic and Monetary Community, Curaçao, the currency union of Curaçao and Sint Maarten, the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union, the euro area, Montserrat, the former Netherlands Antilles, Sint Maarten, the West African Economic Monetary Union, West Bank and Gaza, and some non-sovereign territorial entities for which statistics are provided internationally on a separate basis. Exchange rates in IFS are classified into three broad categories, reflecting the role of the authorities in determining the rates and/or the multiplicity of the exchange rates in a country. The three categories are the market rate, describing an exchange rate determined largely by market forces; the official rate, describing an exchange rate determined by the authorities—sometimes in a flexible manner; and the principal, secondary, or tertiary rate, for countries maintaining multiple exchange arrangements.