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International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept.
This report evaluates the observance of standards and codes on Financial Action Task Force recommendations for anti-money laundering and combating the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) in Mexico. Mexico has a mature AML/CFT regime, with a correspondingly well-developed legal and institutional framework. The financial sector demonstrates a good understanding of the primary money laundering threats from organized crime groups and associated criminal activities as well as tax crimes, but the recognition of corruption as a main threat is uneven. Mexico also has a solid legal and institutional framework in place to seek and provide mutual legal assistance and extradition. The authorities also frequently rely on other forms of international cooperation to exchange information with other countries.
International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept.
This report provides a summary of the anti-money laundering/combating the financing of terrorism (AML/CFT) measures in place in Mexico. Mexico has a mature AML/CFT regime, with a correspondingly well-developed legal and institutional framework. Most of the key authorities have a good understanding of money laundering (ML) and terrorist financing risks, and there is generally good policy cooperation and coordination. The financial sector demonstrates a good understanding of the primary ML threats from organized crime groups and associated criminal activities as well as tax crimes, but the recognition of corruption as a main threat is uneven. Financial intelligence and other relevant information are made available by the financial intelligence unit and accessed on a regular basis by competent authorities.
Ms. Michaela Erbenova, Ms. Yan Liu, Mr. Nadim Kyriakos-Saad, Aledjandro Lopez Mejia, Jose Giancarlo Gasha, Mr. Emmanuel Mathias, Mr. Mohamed Norat, Ms. Francisca Fernando, and Ms. Yasmin Almeida
This paper focuses on the withdrawal of correspondent banking relationships (CBRs) in some jurisdictions post-global financial crisis. It describes existing evidence and consequences of the withdrawal of CBRs and explores drivers of this phenomenon drawing on recent surveys and select country information. While the withdrawal of CBRs has reached a critical level in some affected countries, which can have a systemic impact if unaddressed, macroeconomic consequences have not been identified so far at a global level. The paper presents responses from the international community to address this phenomenon, and explains the role that the IMF has been playing in this global effort, especially with regards to supporting member countries in the context of surveillance and technical assistance, facilitating dialogue among stakeholders, and encouraging data gathering efforts. The paper concludes by suggesting policy responses by public and private sector stakeholders needed to further mitigate potential negative impacts that could undermine financial stability, inclusion, growth and development goals.