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International Monetary Fund
In this paper, the economic growth of Suriname is discussed. The fiscal deficit shifted from 2.2 percent to 3.3 percent of GDP during 2009–10. In 2010, CLICO-Suriname was acquired by a local insurance company. The need to rein in current expenditure and avoid development of wage–price inflation and strengthen the social support programs are stressed by the authorities. The introduction of VAT and other systems are discussed. Finally, improvement over the business environment to facilitate the development of the private sector and global economy was encouraged.
International Monetary Fund
This 2009 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic activity weakened in Suriname in 2009 in the context of lower alumina and oil prices and a sharp output decline in the alumina sector. However, economic growth is estimated to have remained positive at 2.5 percent, supported by buoyant activity in the gold and construction sectors. Inflation has fallen sharply. Executive Directors have welcomed the authorities’ decision to postpone the reduction in the corporate tax rate, as this would adversely affect tax collections.
Goohoon Kwon and Mr. Raphael A Espinoza
This paper assesses the extent of regional financial integration in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) by analyzing equity prices in the region and rigidity of external financing constraints. The results are presented in a cross-regional perspective. The Caribbean stock markets are not as well integrated as one would expect from the extent of cross-listing and importance of regional banking groups: price differentials of cross-listed stocks reach an average of 5 percent. Auto-Regressive models suggest that these price differentials are only slowly arbitraged away, with half-lives exceeding 7 worked days, even when looking only at large arbitrage opportunities (using a Threshold Auto-Regressive model). A speculative methodology using macroeconomic data seems to confirm these findings. A strong mean reversion of the current account (respectively regional trade imbalances) is interpreted, following Obstfeld and Taylor (2004), as a lack of ways to finance current account deficits, i.e. a lack of global (respectively regional) financial integration. The region appears to be much less integrated than the EU15 or the ASEAN+3 groups, although it fares well compared to other LDCs.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund
This 2007 Article IV Consultation highlights that aided by favorable external conditions and an improvement in macroeconomic management, Suriname’s economic performance has improved in recent years. Since 2002, the central government deficit has declined sharply, leading to a substantial decrease in public debt as a share of GDP. Monetary policy has focused on reducing inflation, while the central bank has become more independent. In 2006, macroeconomic performance was better than anticipated, benefiting from a continued favorable external environment. The outlook for 2007 looks broadly positive.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund
Suriname’s 2005 Article IV Consultation reports that economic activity has strengthened reflecting increased mining output and investment. The principal short-term challenge for Suriname is to maintain disciplined fiscal and monetary policies, especially to contain the inflation impact of the increase in domestic fuel prices. Over the medium term, the priority will be to entrench a consistent macroeconomic policy framework and advance critical public sector reforms to minimize the vulnerability to exogenous shocks and improve the competitiveness of nonmining sectors.
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper for Suriname describes the structure of the financial system, and provides a preliminary assessment of the conditions of the banking system. It highlights the need for a comprehensive public sector reform, targeting both the civil service and the public enterprises, and reviews the recent policy developments and financial sector reforms. It also provides the IMF's projections and estimates for Suriname on central government operations in percent of GDP; central government revenues, grants, and expenditure in billions of guilders and in percent of GDP; summary accounts of the banking system, and so on.
International Monetary Fund
This paper reviews economic developments in Suriname during 1994–96. In 1995, there was a major turnaround in Suriname’s economic and financial situation following the expansionary fiscal and monetary policies pursued in the first half of the 1990s and the political and economic disruptions of the 1980s. The marked improvement was owing to the restoration of financial discipline, a strengthening of international bauxite prices, and the unification and subsequent stabilization of the exchange rate. The inflation fell further to less than 1 percent in 1996.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.