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Mr. Zamid Aligishiev, Mr. Giovanni Melina, and Luis-Felipe Zanna
This note is a user’s manual for the DIGNAR-19 toolkit, an application aimed at facilitating the use of the DIGNAR-19 model by economists with no to little knowledge of Matlab and Dynare via a user-friendly Excel-based interface. he toolkit comprises three tools—the simulation tool, the graphing tool, and the realism tool—that translate the contents of an Excel input file into instructions for Matlab/Dynare programs. These programs are executed behind the scenes. Outputs are saved in a separate Excel file and can also be visualized in customizable charts.
Mr. Ralph Chami
Cette note est un guide d’utilisation du tableur sur le chômage, outil économétrique qui permet d’analyser et de projeter les indicateurs du marché du travail dans les pays dotés d’une couverture statistique suffisante. La section I expose les raisons qui ont motivé la mise au point d’un nouvel outil de surveillance applicable aux marchés du travail, et résume les principales caractéristiques du tableur. La section II décrit en détail les données requises et leurs sources. La section III présente les méthodes utilisées pour estimer l’élasticité emploi-croissance, indice qui renseigne sur la réaction de l’emploi à la production. La section IV offre une présentation des graphiques de projections et du tableau de perspectives à moyen terme produits à partir du tableur une fois que les données de base sont adaptées pour calculer une élasticité appropriée. Enfin, la section V explique comment interpréter les résultats obtenus et passe en revue les questions soulevées par les projections.
Mr. Ralph Chami
This note is a reference guide for the unemployment template, an econometric tool that allows researchers to analyze and project labor market indicators for any country with sufficient data coverage. Section I explains the motivation behind designing a new surveillance tool to study labor markets, and summarizes the key features of the template. Section II details the data inputs needed and their sources. Section III describes the methods used to estimate the employment-growth elasticity, a measure of the extent to which employment responds to output. Section IV outlines the medium-term outlook table and projection charts created by the template once the inputs are customized to generate an appropriate elasticity. Finally, Section V presents a discussion on how to interpret the results produced by the template, and of the issues that arise from projecting labor market indicators.
Mr. Ralph Chami
This note is a reference guide for the unemployment template, an econometric tool that allows researchers to analyze and project labor market indicators for any country with sufficient data coverage. Section I explains the motivation behind designing a new surveillance tool to study labor markets, and summarizes the key features of the template. Section II details the data inputs needed and their sources. Section III describes the methods used to estimate the employment-growth elasticity, a measure of the extent to which employment responds to output. Section IV outlines the medium-term outlook table and projection charts created by the template once the inputs are customized to generate an appropriate elasticity. Finally, Section V presents a discussion on how to interpret the results produced by the template, and of the issues that arise from projecting labor market indicators.
Mr. Ralph Chami
This note is a reference guide for the unemployment template, an econometric tool that allows researchers to analyze and project labor market indicators for any country with sufficient data coverage. Section I explains the motivation behind designing a new surveillance tool to study labor markets, and summarizes the key features of the template. Section II details the data inputs needed and their sources. Section III describes the methods used to estimate the employment-growth elasticity, a measure of the extent to which employment responds to output. Section IV outlines the medium-term outlook table and projection charts created by the template once the inputs are customized to generate an appropriate elasticity. Finally, Section V presents a discussion on how to interpret the results produced by the template, and of the issues that arise from projecting labor market indicators.
International Monetary Fund
This technical note provides criteria for evaluating government employment and compensation and options for reform. The note discusses various quantitative indicators that can be used for country analysis and provides an assessment of differences across regions and country groups. It addresses short- and medium-term options for reform and country experiences. Data tables, which can be useful for comparative analysis, are provided. The note underscores that technical analysis of employment and compensation issues must be accompanied by judgment to weigh the tradeoffs between competing objectives.
William Joseph Crandall
This technical note focuses on the concept of autonomy and describes why it is important in public administration. There has been a tendency for governments to increase the autonomy of their departments and agencies. The basic principle is that such autonomy can lead to better performance by removing impediments to effective and efficient management while maintaining appropriate accountability and transparency. This note explains how autonomy is relevant for revenue administration and what is the range of autonomy currently practiced. The paper also describes key measures of autonomy in revenue administration.
Mr. Duncan P Last and Mr. Marc Robinson
This technical note presents a basic model of performance-based budgeting. It describes the characteristics of the model and explains how low-income countries should approach performance-based budgeting. The note emphasizes necessary preconditions for any move to performance-based budgeting—recognizing that performance-based budgeting, even in its basic form, should not be considered in countries with seriously dysfunctional public financial management and governance systems. The note also outlines reasons why more complex performance-based budgeting models of performance-based budgeting may not be appropriate in many countries.