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Kiyoshi Nakayama
A well-designed regional tax treaty to which developing countries are signatories will include provisions securing minimum withholding taxes on investment income and technical service fees, a taxing right in respect of capital gains from indirect offshore transfers, and guarding against-treaty shopping. A tax treaty policy framework—national or regional—that specifies the main policy outcomes to be achieved before negotiations commence would enable developing countries with more limited expertise and lower capacity for tax treaty negotiations to avoid concluding problematic tax treaties. This note provides guidance for members of regional economic communities in the developing world on what should and should not be included in a regional tax treaty and how to design on a common tax treaty policy framework for use in negotiations of bilateral tax treaties with nonmembers.
Wouter Bossu, Mr. Cory Hillier, and Mr. Wolfgang Bergthaler
Recent financial crises including the ongoing one caused by the COVID-19 pandemic have consistently drawn attention to the need to strengthen the quality of public debt management in emerging markets and developing countries. Deeper and more efficient domestic government debt markets—being, a key segment of the LCBM for many emerging markets and developing economies—play a key role in reducing financial vulnerability to shocks and enable governments to finance critical economic and fiscal policy measures in response to them. Policymakers and international organizations have long recognized that developing and strengthening LCBMs is a key policy prescription to sound public debt management. Robust legal and regulatory frameworks are recognized as being critical building blocks for the structure, development and functioning of LCBMs. This Working Paper seeks to outline a strategically anchored methodology that can be applied to design, build and implement the legal and tax foundations for the development of LCBMs that would adequately address common challenges and impediments.
International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
This Technical Assistance report focuses on Ukraine’s distributed profit tax, voluntary disclosure of assets, and Base Erosion and Profit Shifting Work Program implementation. The recommendations largely favor simplifying rules, improving the definition of basic concepts, eliminating potential loopholes, and adhering more closely to international standards in some cases. Thus, for the sake of simplification, the report recommends that Controlled Foreign Corporation rules should apply to the ‘first onshore’ person rather than having to trace them back to the ultimate beneficial owner in Ukraine. Also, it recommends that the proposed interest deduction limitation should eliminate the carry-forward currently permitted, limit deductions to net interest expense and exempt the financial sector from this limitation. Some key definitions can be improved too. The report suggests that if there is an urgent need to promote private investments, the accelerated depreciation tool should be applied for plant and machinery and structures housing them for say another five years.
Martin Grote
Création d’une unité de politique fiscale
Martin Grote
How to Establish a Tax Policy Unit
Martin Grote
How to Establish a Tax Policy Unit
Martin Grote
This paper explores that in developing economies, sufficient tax revenue is necessary to finance spending on health care, education, and infrastructure—all of which are prerequisites for economic growth and development. However, it is not simply the revenue ratio that matters; the quality of the revenue system is also essential for delivering fair and efficient outcomes. To design a revenue system that fosters sustainable economic and social development and enjoys broad public support, it is essential for tax reform proposals to be carefully assessed, quantitatively analyzed, and openly debated. This requires that decision makers and all stakeholders in the debate have access to the best available facts, data, and independent evidence-based analysis, including about the impact of tax reforms on revenue, the income distribution, and economic performance. The central institutional actor in the decision making process—the executive—is best supported in this process by what is generally called a tax policy unit (TPU). TPUs are tasked to guide and inform the tax policy debate, based on facts, independent data analysis, and multidisciplinary efforts.
International Monetary Fund. European Dept.
This paper focuses on the corporate income tax (CIT) regime that features a high statutory rate but low revenue productivity, as well as a bias toward debt financing, ineffective size-dependent regimes, and inefficient tax incentives. Profit-insensitive taxes are comparatively high. Anti-tax-avoidance rules are strong, but risks to outbound profit shifting remain. Tax uncertainty is another concern. At the individual level, the system of taxing wealth and capital income is complex, with distortions from differential taxation across savings instruments. To address some of these issues and make the tax system more supportive of growth and job creation, the government plans to reduce the CIT rate, further cut the labor tax wedge, unify taxes on capital income, and narrow the wealth tax. Staff’s analysis suggests that complementing these reforms with measures to remove inefficient tax incentives, further reduce the debt bias, address disincentives to company growth, and streamline the taxation of long-term savings could enhance their impact on competitiveness, revenues, and growth.