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International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept. and International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
At the request of His Excellency the President of the Republic and Head of State, the Legal (LEG) and Fiscal Affairs (FAD) Departments of the IMF conducted an assessment of governance and corruption mission in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) from December 9 to 20, 2019 (the “mission”).1 The objectives of the mission were to discuss with the authorities (i) a diagnostic of governance issues in the DRC; and (ii) to articulate measures to help improve governance and the fight against corruption.
International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept. and International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
At the request of His Excellency the President of the Republic and Head of State, the Legal (LEG) and Fiscal Affairs (FAD) Departments of the IMF conducted an assessment of governance and corruption mission in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) from December 9 to 20, 2019 (the “mission”).1 The objectives of the mission were to discuss with the authorities (i) a diagnostic of governance issues in the DRC; and (ii) to articulate measures to help improve governance and the fight against corruption.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper presents Democratic Republic of the Congo’s (DRC) Request for Disbursement Under the Rapid Credit Facility (RCF). DRC is experiencing a severe shock as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. The short-term economic outlook has deteriorated quickly due to the fall of minerals’ prices and the impact of needed containment and mitigation measures. The IMF’s emergency financial support under the RCF is expected to address DRC’s urgent balance of payments needs while supporting this temporary fiscal loosening. Additional assistance from other development partners is expected to close the remaining external financing gap and ease budget financing needs. The authorities’ commitment to publish monthly audits of coronavirus disease 2019 related expenditures is welcome, to ensure transparency in the use of public funding. The implementation of the policies and structural reforms to which the authorities committed under the staff-monitored program agreed in December remains key to ensuring macroeconomic stability and restoring sustained inclusive growth. These include strengthening transparency and governance in the fiscal and mining sectors, boosting revenue mobilization, maintaining financial stability, and halting central bank financing of the deficit.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This Selected Issues paper focuses on macro-critical issues related to governance and corruption in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Third-party indicators suggest that governance has been poor and corruption widespread in the country. Conducting an audit of the civil service and improving the transparency of its remuneration system, simplifying tax payment processes, and merging the activities of the numerous revenue agencies would boost public efficiency and improve the business environment. Contract enforcement and protection of property rights could be enhanced by insulating the courts from external influence. Limited information on the budget annexes and special accounts and little or no oversight by the central government, Parliament, and civil society, create scope for corruption. The multiplicity of special taxes and fees, some accruing to special accounts outside the Treasury, generate opportunities for corruption and informalization of economic activity. Despite some progress in strengthening public financial management, budget execution remains deficient. The government has formalized the four stages of the expenditure chain and introduced budget commitment plans to align expenditures with revenues.
Linxi Chen, Ding Ding, and Rui Mano
In late 2015, the Chinese authorities launched a policy to reduce capacity in the coal and steel industries under the wider effort of Supply-Side Structural Reforms. Around the same time, producer price inflation in China started to pick up strongly after being trapped in negative territory for more than fifty consecutive months. So what is behind this strong reflation—capacity cuts in coal and steel, or a strengthening of aggregate demand? Our empirical analyses indicate that a pickup in aggregate demand, possibly due to the government’s stimulus package in 2015-16, was the more important driver. Capacity cuts played a role in propping up coal and steel prices, explaining at most 40 percent of their price increase.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses Guinea’s 2016–20 National Economic and Social Development Plan (PNDES). The PNDES represents the second generation of planning under the Third Republic, after the 2011–15 Five-Year Plan. Through the 2016–20 PNDES, the authorities intend to address the various development challenges posed by the socioeconomic and environmental situation while ensuring post-Ebola public health surveillance and alignment with international development agendas. The principal beneficiaries of the PNDES are the Guinean populations, but particularly poor and vulnerable groups, the government itself, the private sector, and the regions, including urban and rural areas.