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International Monetary Fund
The Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS) of the Republic of Tajikistan for 2010–12 aims to serve as a medium-term program for the implementation of the National Development Strategy up to 2015. It will determine the major socioeconomic development of the country during this period, taking into account the impact of the global economic and financial crisis. The PRS, taking into account available resources and additional needs, indicates concrete actions for implementing institutional and economic reforms.
International Monetary Fund

Tajikistan’s growth potential is constrained by government interference in markets, and poor energy and transport infrastructure. The report focuses on Tajikistan’s combined 2009 Article IV Consultation, final review under the Staff-Monitored Program, and request for a Three-Year Arrangement under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility. Macroeconomic policies may need to be tightened further if external developments turn out worse than currently projected. Alternatively, additional donor support could ease the domestic adjustment burden.

International Monetary Fund
This Joint Staff Advisory Note on the Republic of Tajikistan’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper discusses economic development and policies. The authorities are working on enhancing Tajikistan’s investment climate through a range of measures, including through eliminating unnecessary licenses and inspections, cutting the number of mandatory standards and easing certification procedures, strengthening property rights, and improving infrastructural services. Reforming the management of Barki Tajik and ensuring the transparency and accountability of operations are critical.
International Monetary Fund
The Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper discusses socioeconomic development in the Republic of Tajikistan. Although poverty reduction in rural areas is proceeding at a faster pace than in urban areas, poverty continues to be a predominantly rural phenomenon. In addition to improving the gender equality situation, there are still pressing issues related to equal access for men and women to education and land use, to the decision-making process, and to employment.
International Monetary Fund

This paper focuses on Tajikistan’s Sixth Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF). The program for 2005 has been implemented satisfactorily. All quantitative and structural performance criteria and indicative targets for end-September 2005 were observed, and all outstanding structural benchmarks for 2005 have either been completed or are in the process of implementation. In view of the authorities’ satisfactory implementation of the program during 2005, the IMF staff is recommending completion of the sixth review under the PRGF.

International Monetary Fund
This paper focuses on Tajikistan’s Sixth Review Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF). The program for 2005 has been implemented satisfactorily. All quantitative and structural performance criteria and indicative targets for end-September 2005 were observed, and all outstanding structural benchmarks for 2005 have either been completed or are in the process of implementation. In view of the authorities’ satisfactory implementation of the program during 2005, the IMF staff is recommending completion of the sixth review under the PRGF.
International Monetary Fund
This Joint Staff Advisory Note discusses the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) Second Progress Report for the Republic of Tajikistan. The progress report presents a comprehensive assessment of the nature and dynamics of poverty from various sources and perspectives, and recognizes the challenges ahead for continued progress in reducing the number of people living in poverty. The report fully acknowledges that the poor quality, reliability, and timeliness of statistics for monitoring progress in poverty reduction are owed to the lack of capacity to collect and analyze data and to the weak coordination between state agencies.
International Monetary Fund
This Second Progress Report on Tajikistan’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) discusses key developments in the status and dynamics of poverty-related indicators in the country during 2004. Although economic growth has generated significant reductions in poverty rates in the past years, the report concludes that people’s livelihoods have not changed drastically. Income poverty remains high. People’s access to energy, water, communications, education, and health services remains highly problematic. This report also reviews the government’s macroeconomic management performance and discusses institutional shortfalls affecting the poverty reduction effort.
International Monetary Fund

This Second Progress Report on Tajikistan’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) discusses key developments in the status and dynamics of poverty-related indicators in the country during 2004. Although economic growth has generated significant reductions in poverty rates in the past years, the report concludes that people’s livelihoods have not changed drastically. Income poverty remains high. People’s access to energy, water, communications, education, and health services remains highly problematic. This report also reviews the government’s macroeconomic management performance and discusses institutional shortfalls affecting the poverty reduction effort.

International Monetary Fund

This Joint Staff Advisory Note discusses the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) Second Progress Report for the Republic of Tajikistan. The progress report presents a comprehensive assessment of the nature and dynamics of poverty from various sources and perspectives, and recognizes the challenges ahead for continued progress in reducing the number of people living in poverty. The report fully acknowledges that the poor quality, reliability, and timeliness of statistics for monitoring progress in poverty reduction are owed to the lack of capacity to collect and analyze data and to the weak coordination between state agencies.