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Ms. Alla Myrvoda and Julien Reynaud
This paper empirically investigates international and domestic monetary policy transmission mechanisms in the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union (ECCU). We assess interest rate pass-through of both the U.S. policy rate and the ECCU minimum saving deposit rate (MSR) into domestic interest rates through the interest rate channel. While economic theory suggests that the international pass-through should be high in small open economies with fixed exchange rates and open capital accounts, our findings, based on regression analysis, point to a low long-run pass-through coefficient of the U.S. interest rate. The domestic transmission channel, however, is found to operate through changes in the MSR. The results hold for different interest rates (deposit and lending) and are supported by survey-based findings.
Chuan Li and Joyce Wong
Many Caribbean financial systems are relatively well developed for their size but benefits are concentrated in a small part of the population. In several large countries, the financial development levels are below what is warranted by that country’s own macroeconomic fundamentals. SMEs, in particular, remain severely credit constrained, and data to inform better analysis remains scarce. Using available data, this paper takes stock of the current state of financial development and inclusion in the Caribbean region and, based on a quantitative general equilibrium model, examines potential trade-offs between growth, inequality, and financial stability—all critical considerations when policies are designed. A case study for Jamaica is examined in detail.
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.
This paper presents the Staff Country Report on St. Vincent and the Grenadines. This Statistical Appendix for St. Vincent and the Grenadines was prepared by a staff team of the IMF as background documentation for the periodic consultation with the member country. It is based on the information available at the time it was completed on December 8, 2006. The views expressed in this document are those of the staff team and do not necessarily reflect the views of the government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines or the Executive Board of the IMF. The policy of publication of staff reports and other documents by the IMF allows for the deletion of market-sensitive information.
International Monetary Fund
This paper proposes a temporary modification of the current guidelines for allocation of currencies used for transfers in the Financial Transactions Plan (FTP). This temporary modification is designed to promote fair burden sharing between NAB participants that have bilateral borrowing agreements or note purchase agreements (hereafter referred to as “bilateral agreements”) and participants that do not have such agreements, and would result in a change from the current approach only for those FTP members that are NAB participants. It is proposed that the current guidelines for allocation of currencies used for transfers be reinstated automatically for all FTP members when all pre-NAB bilateral agreements have been terminated and when any imbalances in NAB positions resulting from the folding in of claims under bilateral agreements have been eliminated, or at an earlier date as decided by the Executive Board.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
Mr. Ghiath Shabsigh and Mr. Nadeem Ilahi
Oil funds have become increasingly popular in oil exporting countries during the recent surge in oil prices. However, the literature on the contribution is small, tends to focus narrowly on their fiscal benefits, and concludes that they are redundant of such funds-in other words, that well designed fiscal management and policy are adequate substitutes for oil funds. This paper argues that a broader focus is needed in judging the effectiveness of such funds. We test whether oil funds help reduce macroeconomic volatility. The econometric estimation results from a 30-year panel data set of 15 countries with and without oil funds suggest that oil funds are associated with reduced volatility of broad money and prices and lower inflation. However, there is a statistically weak negative association between the presence of an oil fund and volatility of the real exchange rate.
International Monetary Fund
In recent years, the IMF has released a growing number of reports and other documents covering economic and financial developments and trends in member countries. Each report, prepared by a staff team after discussions with government officials, is published at the option of the member country.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
Rising Energy Costs, Liberia to get debt relief, Climate Change, World Economic Outlook, European Economic Outlook, Latin American Economic Outlook, Mideast-Central Asia Economic Outlook, Technical Assistance, Research Conference, Mundell-Flemming Lecture, German fiscal policy, News Briefs.
International Monetary Fund
Barbados' economy continued to grow, but macroeconomic imbalances worsened. Executive Directors observed that the imbalances are owed to a procyclical fiscal stance, and advised to tighten monetary policy and safeguard the fixed exchange rate regime as an anchor of macroeconomic stability. They also emphasized to strengthen the financial sector regulatory framework and develop the financial market infrastructure. They commended the strong performance of the public pension system, banking indicators, and the agenda of CARICOM Single Market Economy (CSME).