Browse

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for :

  • Poverty and Homelessness x
  • Investments: General x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. Western Hemisphere Dept.

KEY ISSUES Context. Prudent macroeconomic policies have underpinned Colombia’s strong growth during the last few years, which exceeded that of most Latin American peers. Last year, the economy posted real growth of 4.6 percent, and average inflation remained near the center of the target range. Monetary and fiscal policies were mildly supportive of growth. The infrastructure agenda is expected to advance this year. Colombia’s government is engaged in ongoing peace negotiations with the main guerilla group (FARC). Outlook and risks. Starting from a position with slightly positive output gap, Colombia faces a large adverse terms of trade shock. Staff projects growth to slow to 3.4 percent in 2015 and gradually rise toward its potential (around 4¼ percent) over the medium-term supported by the government’s PPP-based infrastructure program and a gradual recovery in oil prices and external demand. Risks are mainly on the downside, including higher interest rates and financial volatility, and a protracted period of slower growth in advanced and emerging economies, and a delayed implementation of the infrastructure program. Macroeconomic policies. Strong headwinds from the severe oil price decline pose significant challenges to the near-term economic outlook. The structural fiscal rule will only partially shield expenditure plans from the oil shock and some fiscal tightening will be required to accommodate lower-than-expected oil revenues. A broadly neutral monetary policy stance will be consistent with achieving the inflation target in the near- term. Medium-term challenges. Colombia’s key challenge will be preserving macroeconomic stability while sustaining strong and inclusive growth through structural reforms. Revenue mobilization is urgently required to protect key social and infrastructure spending while adhering to the medium-term fiscal rule targets amid less favorable external conditions (weaker terms of trade and tighter financing conditions).

International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This Joint Staff Advisory Note focuses on the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper for Rwanda. Rwanda’s second Economic Development and Poverty Reduction Strategy (EDPRS 2) covers FY2013/14–2017/18. It builds on the lessons learned in the implementation of the EDPRS 1. Among the positive lessons, the authorities point to the importance of ownership of the strategy including aid-financed programs, home-grown initiatives, community-based solutions, and an adequate institutional and legal framework. The overall objectives of the EDPRS 2 are to accelerate growth and further reduce poverty, including extreme poverty.
Dean Karlan

By combating malaria with mosquito nets or building schools and providing basic sanitation, philanthropy is helping transform the developing world. Rich donors are devoting fortunes—many of them earned through computer software, entertainment, and venture capitalism— to defeating poverty and improving lives, supplementing and in some cases surpassing official aid channels.From billionaires Bill and Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett to Aliko Dangote and George Soros, the titans of capitalism are backing good causes with their cash. Whether financing new vaccines, building libraries, or buying up Amazon rain forest to protect the environment, philanthropists are supporting innovations and new approaches that are changing lives and building dreams.This issue of F&D looks at the world of targeted giving and social entrepreneurship.“ Philanthropy’s role is to get things started,” says Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, who is the world’s most generous giver. “We used foundation funds to set up a system to make market forces work in favor of the poor.” He says that catalytic philanthropy can make a big difference. “Good ideas need evangelists. Forgotten communities need advocates.” Former U.S. President Bill Clinton tells us that networks of creative cooperation between government, business, and civil society can get things done better to solve the world’s most pressing problems.Also in this issue, Prakash Loungani profiles superstar economist Jeffrey Sachs, who helped campaign for debt relief for developing economies and championed the Millennium Development Goals. We look at how, instead of spending commodity price windfalls on physical investments, which are often sources of corruption, governments of poor countries are sometimes well advised to hand some of the income over to their citizens. We examine moves by major central banks to ease our way out of the crisis enveloping advanced economies in our Data Spotlight column, and we hear about how China’s growth inspires creativity in the West.

International Monetary Fund
This paper discusses implementation of the Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS) in Liberia. Liberia’s PRS articulates the government’s overall vision and major strategies for moving toward rapid, inclusive, and sustainable growth and development during the period 2008–11. This paper provides the context for the PRS by describing the conflict and economic collapse, the transition beyond conflict, and the initial progress achieved during the past two years. It stresses that Liberia must create much greater economic and political opportunities for all its citizens and ensure that growth and development are widely shared.
International Monetary Fund
According to the national household survey conducted during the summer and autumn of 2005, poverty in Afghanistan (headcount rate) is about 33 percent. Economic performance since the fall of the Taliban regime has been strong, and macroeconomic stability has been maintained. During 2002–03 through 2006–07, real GDP growth has averaged 15 percent per year, reflecting a recovery in agriculture, donor-funded postwar reconstruction, and initial yet promising growth of a range of private sector activities. The macroeconomic policy framework is broadly in line with the authorities’ economic program.
International Monetary Fund

This paper discusses the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper—National Development Plan for the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste. The plan has been a participative process, involving constituents in every sector of the economy to identify the problems they face and to suggest solutions to those problems. East Timor’s Development Strategy as described in this plan is to design programs and pursue initiatives that systematically address its main development goals. The first set of tasks during this early transition stage is to establish government capabilities, enabling legislation and the institutions required to pursue development priorities.

Guy Pfeffermann

For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.

Danny M. Leipziger

For the latest thinking about the international financial system, monetary policy, economic development, poverty reduction, and other critical issues, subscribe to Finance & Development (F&D). This lively quarterly magazine brings you in-depth analyses of these and other subjects by the IMF’s own staff as well as by prominent international experts. Articles are written for lay readers who want to enrich their understanding of the workings of the global economy and the policies and activities of the IMF.

Martin Shivnan

This paper reviews the population policy in developed countries. The paper highlights that despite the weakness of population concerns in most developed countries compared with less-developed countries, most of the former have taken certain actions that affect, or are thought to affect, demographic events. These actions include such measures as appointing official commissions to study the country’s demographic situation and advise the government what to do; providing birth control services as part of the public health system; and so on. This paper also summarizes the conclusions drawn by Dr. Berelson from the 25 country reports.