Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • Slovenia, Republic of x
  • National Budget; Budget Systems x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper analyzes the challenges that the Republic of Slovenia will face in the coming years. It examines the efficiency of the Slovene banking sector in the European Union context. The paper analyzes indicators of bank efficiency by comparing performance indicators for banks in Slovenia, the European Monetary Union, and new member states. It presents results from cross-country econometric estimates of banking sector cost efficiency. The paper also discusses results from estimates of cross-country banking sector contestability, and the determinants of efficiency and contestability.
Robert Sierhej and Mr. Christoph B. Rosenberg
Drawing on a dataset suitable for macroeconomic analysis, the paper provides an overview of the magnitudes, purpose and institutional implications of EU-related transfers to and from the new member states. A rough analysis of accounting identities and first-round effects shows that EU funds may have led to a fiscal drag of up to 1 percent of GDP and an additional aggregate demand stimulus of up to 1 percent of GDP during the first years of membership. These effects are likely to increase as additional funding become available under the new financial perspective, pointing to the need to consider policy tradeoffs.
International Monetary Fund

This paper provides a background on the key policy challenges for Slovenia in the euro zone. Then, it assesses the discretionary scope to adjust spending and proposes initial steps to enhance budget flexibility so that fiscal adjustment can be targeted on relatively inefficient spending. This study also discusses the long-term fiscal sustainability position of Slovenia using a generational accounting framework. A simulation of retirement incentives suggests that the pension system will encourage individuals to retire earlier than the statutory full pensionable age. These incentives are stronger for low-income earners.

International Monetary Fund
This Selected Issues paper provides a quantitative assessment of the determinants of inflation in Slovenia, and evaluates the likelihood of the Maastricht inflation criterion being met. It concludes that on the basis of currently identified policies, Slovene inflation will likely remain above the Maastricht criterion over the assessment period. The IMF staff analysis suggests that the economic slowdown related to the unfavorable external environment contributed about two-thirds to disinflation in 2003. This paper also analyzes the direct fiscal implications of European Union accession on Slovenia.
Mr. Jack Diamond and Mr. Duncan P Last
For the republics of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY) as for many other transition economies, an important step in introducing a more market-oriented system was the restructuring of their budget systems. This paper reviews and evaluates the process of budget system reform during the transition period extending from the time they emerged from the collapse of the SFRY in 1989 until the end of 2002. For at least a decade of this period, the Fiscal Affairs Department of the IMF has been providing technical assistance (TA) to these countries to facilitate such reforms. Based on the material generated by this effort, the authors offer a review of the progress made and an assessment of the reform elements still to be completed. Given that the former Yugoslav republics all commenced the reform process with the same institutions, this paper offers a unique opportunity to analyze the critical elements in successful budget system reform. An attempt is made to explain the varying degrees of success experienced by different countries, and a reform agenda is suggested to guide future TA.
International Monetary Fund
This 2003 Article IV Consultation highlights that economic growth in the Republic of Slovenia slowed during 2001–02 to about 3 percent, owing to a weak external environment and subdued domestic demand. Export growth slowed as demand from the European Union weakened, but the impact was cushioned by a rapid expansion of exports to southeastern Europe and Russia. With imports growing more slowly than exports and the terms of trade improving, the external current account swung into surplus in 2001 and strengthened further in 2002, reflecting a satisfactory competitive position.
International Monetary Fund
This report evaluates the Observance of Standards and Codes on Fiscal Transparency Module for the Republic of Slovenia. Slovenia meets the requirements of the fiscal transparency code in many important respects. The basic legislation and practices are in line with many Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and European Union countries, and there is generally a clear specification of the roles and responsibilities of different institutions. The basic policies for provision of information are consistent with international practices and procedures for budget preparation.
International Monetary Fund

This 2002 Article IV Consultation highlights that the economic growth of Slovenia slowed in 2001 from about 4.5 percent to about 3 percent as domestic demand fell sharply and external demand weakened. Competitiveness remained strong and the current account deficit narrowed to about ½ percentage point of GDP. Real export growth decelerated from 12.7 percent in 2000 to 7.9 percent in the first three quarters of 2001. The planned reduction in the budget deficit in 2001 did not materialize because of expenditure overruns.

International Monetary Fund
This 2002 Article IV Consultation highlights that the economic growth of Slovenia slowed in 2001 from about 4.5 percent to about 3 percent as domestic demand fell sharply and external demand weakened. Competitiveness remained strong and the current account deficit narrowed to about ½ percentage point of GDP. Real export growth decelerated from 12.7 percent in 2000 to 7.9 percent in the first three quarters of 2001. The planned reduction in the budget deficit in 2001 did not materialize because of expenditure overruns.
International Monetary Fund

This 2002 Article IV Consultation highlights that the economic growth of Slovenia slowed in 2001 from about 4.5 percent to about 3 percent as domestic demand fell sharply and external demand weakened. Competitiveness remained strong and the current account deficit narrowed to about ½ percentage point of GDP. Real export growth decelerated from 12.7 percent in 2000 to 7.9 percent in the first three quarters of 2001. The planned reduction in the budget deficit in 2001 did not materialize because of expenditure overruns.