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International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper highlights that important changes have been made in the World Bank’s management systems since Mr. A. W. Clausen became President in July 1981. The changes reflect Mr. Clausen’s belief that there needs to be a more collegial approach to decision making and greater delegation of authority. The aim is that the World Bank should become more efficient and its activities should be more responsive to its clients’ needs. A Managing Committee was also established to take decisions on all key issues facing the World Bank.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper discusses the employment of women in developing countries in the light of recent changes in emphasis on the strategy and objectives of economic development. The paper highlights that in the vast majority of countries—both developed and developing—the role of women is still limited and their responsibilities restricted. This paper examines automated manufacturing techniques in developing economies. The operations and transactions of the special drawing account are discussed. The paper also analyzes Latin America’s prospects for overcoming historical attitudes and other constraints to achieve wider economic integration.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper focuses on currency convertibility and the exchange rate system. The paper explains some of the factors involved in extending the freedom of currency convertibility, one of the IMF’s principal policy aims. It highlights that the IMF’s Articles of Agreement make the distinction between currency convertibility for residents and for nonresidents, but make it an obligation in principle to avoid restrictions on current payments of both categories. The paper also discusses management in developing countries as well as the link between growth and structural change.
International Monetary Fund. External Relations Dept.
This paper focuses on telecommunication development in Ethiopia. The paper highlights that there are now over 20,000 telephones in Addis Ababa (in 1969), but the demand for service still exceeds the supply. About 800 installation requests are received each quarter; of these, 600 can be fulfilled. Ethiopia’s annual telephone growth rate has averaged 17 percent over the past six years. Though long-distance lines have been expanded by 125 percent since the early 1950s, the interurban network between Addis Ababa and the rest of the country is seriously overloaded.