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International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
Malaysia entered the pandemic from a robust economic position but has nonetheless been significantly affected. A synchronous fiscal, monetary and financial policy response has helped cushion the economic impact. As a result, after a deep recession in 2020, and assuming the pandemic is brought under control in Malaysia and globally, growth would rebound to 6.5 percent in 2021 as supply side constraints are lifted and domestic and external demand recover. Large downside risks will remain.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
This 2018 Article IV Consultation highlights that the Malaysian economy has shown resilience in recent years despite external shocks and has continued to perform well. Progress was made toward achieving high income status and improving inclusion. Median household income has risen further and the already-low national poverty ratio declined. Real GDP growth has surprised on the upside in 2017, and is estimated at 5.8 percent for the year, driven by domestic demand and robust exports. Growth is projected to start to decelerate from its 2017 peak, remaining above potential at 5.3 percent in 2018, and converging to its potential rate of close to 5 percent in the medium term.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
This paper discusses the extent to which the Malaysian economy has been hit by a number of external and domestic shocks since late 2014, including sharply lower energy prices, spillovers from China, capital outflows, and domestic political controversies. The 2016 budget, including January recalibration, reaffirms the government’s commitment to fiscal consolidation. The current accommodative monetary policy stance is appropriate in an environment of moderating growth and low inflation. Facing sizeable capital outflows and a sharp fall in oil and commodity prices, exchange rate depreciated substantially. The central bank deployed reserves; the effect on domestic interest rates was modest. Credit growth has moderated, a welcome development after several years of double-digit growth.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
This report discusses Malaysia’s economic accomplishment and other economic reforms. Malaysia has attained a strong growth in 2012, and a robust growth is expected in the next term. The financial position of Malaysia is sound and supported by a strong regulatory framework with high bank capitals, international reserves, and refined monetary and financial policies. Fiscal policies need to be restructured, and public financial management needs to be strengthened to deal with risks. The authorities expected Malaysia to be a high-income nation by 2020.
International Monetary Fund
This 2011 Article IV Consultation reports that Malaysia’s economy is vulnerable to a prolonged downturn in advanced economies or a sharp escalation in global financial stress. Weaker exports and terms of trade would spillover into domestic demand. Financial spillovers could include a reversal of cross-border bank and portfolio flows. Healthy financial and corporate balance sheets, ample foreign exchange reserves, and room to further loosen monetary policy would help contain the impact of an external shock on the financial sector and the economy.
International Monetary Fund
Strong fundamentals and countercyclical policies have helped Malaysia during the global financial crisis. Executive Directors welcomed the authorities' challenge to make progress toward economic growth and structural transformation. Directors welcomed the consolidation effort in the 2010 budget, and stressed that a sound and sustained fiscal adjustment is essential. Directors appreciated the monetary policy stance to sustain noninflation growth. They welcomed the new Central Bank Act, which reinforces the underpinnings of the financial system. Directors also commended the authorities’ decision to participate in the Financial Sector Assessment Program.
Thomas Laryea
This paper starts from a discussion of the economic case for moderated government intervention in debt restructuring in the nonfinancial corporate sector. It then draws on lessons from past crises to explain three broad approaches that have been applied to corporate debt restructurings in the aftermath of a crisis. From there, it addresses challenges in designing and implementing a comprehensive debt restructuring strategy and draws together some key principles.
International Monetary Fund
This 2009 Article IV Consultation highlights that Malaysia has been hit hard by the global downturn. The economy is set to contract for the first time in 10 years. Global turbulence has spilled into the domestic financial markets. Executive Directors have commended the Malaysian authorities for sound macroeconomic management in difficult circumstances. Directors have also emphasized that, although the financial sector appears sound and benefited from the growth of Islamic finance, volatile global markets put a premium on crisis preparedness and proactive supervision.
Mr. Jorge A Chan-Lau and Mr. Toni Gravelle
This paper describes a corporate sector vulnerability indicator, the expected number of defaults (END), based on the joint occurrence of defaults among a number of firms and/or institutions. The END indicator is general enough to assess systemic risk in the corporate and financial sectors, as well as systemic sovereign risk; and is also forward looking as it is constructed using information implied by financial securities prices. Using equity prices and balance-sheet data, we calculate the END to assess systemic risk in the corporate sector in Korea, Malaysia, and Thailand. We also discuss how the END systemic risk indicator overcomes some of the shortcomings of other vulnerability indicators.