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International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The October 2019 Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) identifies the current key vulnerabilities in the global financial system as the rise in corporate debt burdens, increasing holdings of riskier and more illiquid assets by institutional investors, and growing reliance on external borrowing by emerging and frontier market economies. The report proposes that policymakers mitigate these risks through stricter supervisory and macroprudential oversight of firms, strengthened oversight and disclosure for institutional investors, and the implementation of prudent sovereign debt management practices and frameworks for emerging and frontier market economies.

Mr. Jorge A Chan-Lau
Diebold and Yilmaz (2015) recently introduced variance decomposition networks as tools for quantifying and ranking the systemic risk of individual firms. The nature of these networks and their implied rankings depend on the choice decomposition method. The standard choice is the order invariant generalized forecast error variance decomposition of Pesaran and Shin (1998). The shares of the forecast error variation, however, do not add to unity, making difficult to compare risk ratings and risks contributions at two different points in time. As a solution, this paper suggests using the Lanne-Nyberg (2016) decomposition, which shares the order invariance property. To illustrate the differences between both decomposition methods, I analyzed the global financial system during 2001 – 2016. The analysis shows that different decomposition methods yield substantially different systemic risk and vulnerability rankings. This suggests caution is warranted when using rankings and risk contributions for guiding financial regulation and economic policy.
Miss Rita Mesias

Abstract

This Coordinated Direct Investment Survey Guide (Guide) has been prepared to assist economies in participating in the Coordinated Direct Investment Survey (CDIS). The CDIS is being conducted under the auspices of the Statistics Department of the IMF across a wide range of economies. The survey is conducted simultaneously by all participating economies; uses consistent definitions; and encourages best practices in collecting, compiling, and disseminating data on direct investment positions. The CDIS is thus an important tool in capturing world totals and the geographic distribution of direct investment positions, thereby contributing to important new understandings of the extent of globalization, and improving the overall quality of direct investment data worldwide. As of the writing of this updated Guide, more than 100 economies participate in the CDIS.

International Monetary Fund
The Liberia Poverty Reduction Strategy (LPRS) was completed in March 2008. Since reaching the decision point in March 2008, Liberia has maintained macroeconomic stability. The global financial crisis adversely impacted Liberia shortly after the LPRS was released. Investments were postponed, and export revenues were sharply reduced in the rubber sector as external demand weakened. The authorities’ strict adherence to a cash-based balanced budget, in place since February 2006, has contributed substantially to regaining fiscal discipline, putting debt on a downward path while also increasing pro-poor expenditures.
International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report identifies potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crisis, while providing comprehensive coverage of mature and emerging financial markets. The GFSR focuses on current conditions in global financial markets, highlighting issues that could pose risks to financial market stability and market access by emerging market borrowers.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report identifies potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crisis, while providing comprehensive coverage of mature and emerging financial markets. The GFSR focuses on current conditions in global financial markets, highlighting issues that could pose risks to financial market stability and market access by emerging market borrowers. The October 2008 GFSR reflects information available up to September 15, 2008.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The events of the past six months have demonstrated the fragility of the global financial system and raised fundamental questions about the effectiveness of the response by private and public sector institutions. The report assesses the vulnerabilities that the system is facing and offers tentative conclusions and policy lessons. The report reflects information available up to March 21, 2008.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

Published twice yearly, the Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) was created to provide a more frequent assessment of global financial markets by the IMF and to address emerging market financing in a global context. It provides timely analysis of developments in both mature and emerging market countries and seeks to identify potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crisis. The GFSR aims to deepen its readers’ understanding of global capital flows, which play a critical role as an engine of world economic growth. Of key value, the report focuses on current conditions in global financial markets, highlighting issues of financial imbalances, and of a structural nature, that could pose risks to financial market stability and sustained market access by emerging market borrowers.

Mr. David S. Hoelscher, Mr. Michael W Taylor, and Mr. Ulrich H Klueh

Abstract

This paper describes recently established deposit insurance systems, identifying emerging trends. In line with previous IMF work on the subject, it argues against the development of "best practices" applicable to all systems. Rather, it stresses the importance of incorporating each country’s individual objectives in adopting a deposit insurance system, as well as that country’s characteristics, to ensure an effective system that minimizes disincentives and distortions to financial sector intermediation. The paper includes a summary of the academic literature.

International Monetary Fund. Monetary and Capital Markets Department

Abstract

The Global Financial Stability Report (GSFR), published twice a year by the IMF, provides timely analysis of developments in mature and emerging market countries and seeks to identify potential fault lines in the global financial system that could lead to crisis. The GFSR aims to deepen its readers’ understanding of global capital flows, which play a critical role as an engine of world economic growth. Along with the IMF’s semiannual World Economic Outlook, the GFSR is a key vehicle for the IMF’s multilateral surveillance. The Global Financial Stability Report was created to provide a more frequent assessment of global financial markets and to address emerging market financing in a global context. The report focuses on current conditions in global financial markets, highlighting issues of financial imbalances, and of a structural nature, that could pose risks to financial market stability and sustained market access by emerging market borrowers. The GFSR focuses on relevant contemporary issues, not attempting to be a comprehensive survey of all potential risks. It also draws out the financial ramifications of economic imbalances highlighted by the IMF’s World Economic Outlook. It regularly contains, as a special feature, articles on structural or systemic issues relevant to international financial stability.