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International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept. and International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
At the request of His Excellency the President of the Republic and Head of State, the Legal (LEG) and Fiscal Affairs (FAD) Departments of the IMF conducted an assessment of governance and corruption mission in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) from December 9 to 20, 2019 (the “mission”).1 The objectives of the mission were to discuss with the authorities (i) a diagnostic of governance issues in the DRC; and (ii) to articulate measures to help improve governance and the fight against corruption.
International Monetary Fund. Legal Dept. and International Monetary Fund. Fiscal Affairs Dept.
At the request of His Excellency the President of the Republic and Head of State, the Legal (LEG) and Fiscal Affairs (FAD) Departments of the IMF conducted an assessment of governance and corruption mission in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) from December 9 to 20, 2019 (the “mission”).1 The objectives of the mission were to discuss with the authorities (i) a diagnostic of governance issues in the DRC; and (ii) to articulate measures to help improve governance and the fight against corruption.
Sebastian Beer and Dan Devlin
Profit shifting remains a key concern in international tax system debate, but discussions are largely based on aggregate estimates, with less attention paid to individual sectors. Drawing on a novel dataset, we quantify tax avoidance risks in the extractive industries, a sector which is revenue critical for many developing economies. We find that a one percentage point increase in the domestic corporate tax rate has historically reduced sectoral profits by slightly over 3 percent; and the response tends to be more pronounced among mining than among hydrocarbon firms. There is only weak evidence transfer pricing rules contain tax minimization efforts of MNEs in our sample, but interest limitation rules (e.g., thin capitalization or earnings based rules) do reduce the observable extent of profit shifting. Our findings highlight the challenge of taxing income in the natural resource sector and suggest how fiscal regime design might be strengthened.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
Real growth is expected at 5.8 percent in 2020, supported by rebounding mining production and investment-led construction activity. Legislative elections and a referendum for a new constitution will be held in March and presidential elections by end-year. Protests against the referendum are ongoing. Risks of political and social instability are high. Covid-19. The baseline scenario is based on the initial global downward revisions to growth due to the COVID-19 outbreak and assumes no outbreak in Guinea. As of March 10, 2020, there was no declared coronavirus case in Guinea. As the situation evolves, the country authorities and staff are keeping a close watch on macroeconomic developments, needed policy responses, and their impact on financing needs.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper focuses on Guinea’s Fourth Review Under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF) Arrangement, and Financing Assurances Review. While performance under the IMF-supported program remains broadly satisfactory, Guinea faces significant downside risks related to coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. The IMF will remain closely engaged with the Guinean country authorities as the situation evolves, and as the authorities further develop their policy responses and financing needs change. The ECF arrangement supports strengthening Guinea’s resilience, scaling-up growth-supporting investment and social-safety nets and promoting private sector development. Achieving the programmed basic fiscal surplus in 2020 will contribute to containing inflation and preserving debt sustainability. Mobilizing additional tax revenues and reducing electricity subsidies will create fiscal space to scale-up growth-supporting public investments and strengthen social safety nets. Implementing programmed tax revenues measures, adopting an automatic petroleum products price adjustment mechanism, and advancing the multi-year electricity tariff reform is key. A prudent borrowing strategy will support scaling-up growth-supporting public investment.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
While macroeconomic policies in recent years have succeeded in restoring elements of macroeconomic stability under difficult circumstances, macroeconomic conditions are nonetheless precarious. The recent fall in commodity prices, new spending initiatives, and looser spending oversight during the political transition period have led to a weaker fiscal position mostly financed by the central bank. In that context, international reserves have fallen to critically low levels (one week of import coverage). Balance of payments needs remain both urgent and protracted.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses The Democratic Republic of the Congo’s Staff-Monitored Program and Request for Disbursement Under the Rapid Credit Facility. The economic environment remains challenging and vulnerable to shocks. Real gross domestic product growth is projected to decelerate to 4.5 percent in 2019 from 5.8 percent in 2018. The recent fall in commodity prices, new spending initiatives, and looser spending oversight during the political transition period have led to a weaker fiscal position mostly financed by the central bank. In this context, international reserves have fallen to critically low levels creating urgent balance of payment needs. The new government is committed to implementing measures and reforms that would strengthen macroeconomic stability, reinforce international reserves, address issues related to poor governance, a difficult business environment, and pervasive poverty. Authorities also intend to boost domestic revenue by restoring the functioning of the value-added tax and enforcing the personal income tax, while improving mining revenue forecasting. In addition, the government intends to introduce strict spending caps, increase the effectiveness of monetary policy, and foster inclusive growth and private sector development including through infrastructure projects and free basic education.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
The Guinean economy is growing at a faster than anticipated pace on the back of buoyant mining activity. The growth momentum is expected to continue, with real growth at about 6 percent in 2018 and over the medium term. However, risks of instability are heightened by the current electoral cycle.