Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • Foreign Exchange x
  • Fiji, Republic of x
Clear All
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
Fiji is enjoying a strong growth momentum due to accommodative policies, robust tourism and strong remittances, and an improvement in the terms of trade. The smooth and peaceful elections in September 2014 marked the return to democracy—leading to a normalization in relations with development partners, further boosting investor and consumer confidence. While addressing infrastructure gaps and further improving the business climate will be critical to ensure strong, sustainable and more inclusive growth, this must be balanced against the need to consolidate fiscal policy. Risks are tilted to the downside, related to external developments and prolonged accommodative policy settings.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
This Selected Issues paper provides an overview of financial access and inclusion indicators, related causal factors, and both current and possible reform priorities for on Papua New Guinea (PNG). The paper presents indicators of financial market depth, development, and access for PNG and compares PNG’s performance against that of other countries in the region, at similar levels of development, and beyond. It provides an overview of country-specific challenges facing PNG related to financial inclusion that helps to explain its performance, as well as possible reform priorities in the near term. The government’s current initiatives aimed at promoting financial sector development and inclusion and their preliminary results are also discussed.
International Monetary Fund. Asia and Pacific Dept
This 2014 Article IV Consultation highlights that growth in Fiji in 2013 accelerated to 4.6 percent. Consumption and investment indicators suggest continued strength in 2014, with economic growth projected at 3.8 percent. Headline inflation is currently low as imported commodity and food prices have remained stable. The Reserve Bank of Fiji lowered its policy rate to 0.5 percent in 2011, and monetary policy has been on hold since then. In response to lower rates and improved confidence, net domestic credit accelerated in the first half of 2014. Based on developments in the first half of 2014, the deficit financing target is on track to be met.
Yongzheng Yang, Hong Chen, Shiu raj Singh, and Baljeet Singh
This study aims to test within a relatively homogeneous group of small states what differentiates the growth performance of Pacific island countries (PICs) from their peers. We find that PICs are disadvantaged by distance and hampered by lower investment and exports compared with other small island states, but greater political stability, catch-up effects from lower initial incomes, and slower population growth have helped offset some of these disadvantages. On balance, policy-related factors, together with geography-related disadvantages, have led to growth rates in PICs that are much lower than in other small states. We also examine how real exchange rate appreciation, unfavorable developments in the external trade environment, and rising international transport costs may have contributed to PICs’ slower growth over the past decade.
International Monetary Fund
Fiji’s economy has contracted by 3 percent in 2009, and marginal growth is estimated for 2010. Foreign exchange reserves have improved steadily following the April 2009 devaluation and stood at over 4 months of imports (US$710 million) at end 2010. Fiji’s economic growth was low in the past few years and the structure of the economy remained broadly unchanged. The weak business climate results in sluggish private investment and is the major impediment to economic growth in Fiji. Fiji’s economy––especially tourism and finance––is linked closely to its regional neighbors.
International Monetary Fund

Fiji’s economy has contracted by 3 percent in 2009, and marginal growth is estimated for 2010. Foreign exchange reserves have improved steadily following the April 2009 devaluation and stood at over 4 months of imports (US$710 million) at end 2010. Fiji’s economic growth was low in the past few years and the structure of the economy remained broadly unchanged. The weak business climate results in sluggish private investment and is the major impediment to economic growth in Fiji. Fiji’s economy––especially tourism and finance––is linked closely to its regional neighbors.

Mr. Jonathan C Dunn, Mr. Matt Davies, Yongzheng Yang, Mr. Yiqun Wu, and Mr. Shengzu Wang
During the global financial crisis, central banks in Pacific island countries eased monetary policy to stimulate economic activity. Judging by the ensuing movements in commercial bank interest rates and private sector credit, monetary policy transmission appears to be weak. This is confirmed by an empirical examination of interest rate pass-through and credit growth. Weak credit demand and underdeveloped financial markets seem to have limited the effectiveness of monetary policy, but the inflexibility of exchange rates and rising real interest rates have also served to frustrate the central banks’ efforts despite a supporting fiscal policy. While highlighting the importance of developing domestic financial markets in the long run, this experience also points to the need to coordinate macroeconomic policies and to use all macroeconomic tools available in conducting countercyclical policies, including exchange rate flexibility.
International Monetary Fund
This 2009 Article IV Consultation highlights that Fiji’s growth has been sluggish in recent years because of delays in economic reforms, worsening terms of trade, and political developments that have strained Fiji’s international relations and hurt business confidence. Fiji’s economy is expected to have contracted by 2½ percent in 2009, reflecting the adverse impact of the global crisis on exports and tourism. Recent developments have put considerable pressure on the budget. Executive Directors have supported a tight monetary policy to ensure that inflation returns to low levels and to protect foreign exchange reserves.
International Monetary Fund

This 2009 Article IV Consultation highlights that Fiji’s growth has been sluggish in recent years because of delays in economic reforms, worsening terms of trade, and political developments that have strained Fiji’s international relations and hurt business confidence. Fiji’s economy is expected to have contracted by 2½ percent in 2009, reflecting the adverse impact of the global crisis on exports and tourism. Recent developments have put considerable pressure on the budget. Executive Directors have supported a tight monetary policy to ensure that inflation returns to low levels and to protect foreign exchange reserves.

International Monetary Fund

This 2002 Article IV Consultation highlights that following the political crisis, Fiji experienced sharp declines in tourism earnings, while external sanctions adversely affected investment and textile exports. As a result, GDP fell 2¾ percent in 2000, and the current account deficit widened to 6½ percent of GDP. Financial stability and the basket peg of the Fiji dollar were maintained through tightening of domestic monetary policy and exchange controls, together with government spending cuts to offset the impact of weaker growth on the fiscal deficit.