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Amr Hosny
A recent World Bank enterprise survey identified access to finance as the top constraint to Doing Business in Nigeria. In this context, the objective of this paper is two-fold: (i) study firm characteristics associated with more access to finance and export diversification; and (ii) quantify the impact of these structural obstacles on firm performance. Results suggest that (i) larger and export-oriented firms are about 40 percentage points less likely to report access to finance as a business obstacle, while firms perceiving access to finance as a constraint are, on average, about 10-40 percentage points less likely to be export-oriented diversified firms; and (ii) better access to finance and export diversification can help firm employment —as much as 80 percent higher— and capacity utilization. Results are largely robust to different specifications and estimation methods.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This Selected Issues paper examines the role of lower oil prices in the recent deterioration in Nigeria’s macroeconomic indicators, the impact on corporate and financial sector performance. and the forward-looking aspects of promoting job-intensive growth and strengthening state and local government finances. Although the slump in oil prices contributed to sluggish growth, the lack of foreign exchange weakened corporate performance, setting the stage for nonperforming loans. Structural reforms to improve the business environment can have a positive impact on growth, while fiscal reforms would help strengthen finances of subnational governments.
International Monetary Fund. African Dept.
This paper discusses a few selected issues of the Nigerian economy—options and strategies for a fiscal rule for oil wealth management, enhancing the effectiveness of monetary policy, and recent developments and prospects of capital flow. Despite its diversified economy, Nigeria’s fiscal policy is heavily dependent on the oil sector. This paper explores options for a formalized rule-based approach to setting a “depoliticized” budget oil price. Two boom-and-bust episodes since early 2000 have highlighted the challenges in the current monetary policy framework. Nigeria has also been characterized by sizable capital outflows, which have diminished recently.